Tag Archives: lucid dream

Episode 157 The Dream Show: Lucid dreaming soul mate

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Episode 157 The Dream Show: Lucid dreaming soul mate

My guest, Scott, taught himself how to lucid dream when he was a young boy, and has been experimenting in his lucid dreams for the past three decades. Scott shares his experiences, including his lucid dreams of meeting friends who have died. We talk about the pros and cons of controlling dreams, and we look at some recurring dream themes Scott has encountered during this time.

The Dream Show with Jane Teresa AndersonA few weeks ago, Scott dreamed he met a beautiful woman and woke up thinking, “I’m in love!” Listen as we explore this dream, discover how it relates to what’s been happening recently in Scott’s life, and see how Scott can use this new dream insight to assist him as he moves through a powerfully healing transition.

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Episode 149 The Dream Show: The hidden library

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The hidden library

My guest today is Karen, with a dream about discovering a hidden library filled with eclectic books and antiquities downstairs in her house. As she wondered who created it and why it wasn’t being used, she became lucid to her dream and lamented that the library – like all the extra rooms she has discovered over the years in other dreams – wouldn’t be real when she woke up.

Karen’s lucid drThe Dream Show with Jane Teresa Andersoneam state faded as the dream rolled on to continue its job of processing her experiences of the last couple of days. Michelle Pfeiffer appears, in both a young and aged version, and an enticing forest track beckons just beyond Karen’s dining room window. Where does it take her, and how does all this help Karen to gain insight into what’s going on in her waking life? Listen to find out!

Thank you to Karen – and to all our past and future guests – for offering to come onto the show to contribute a dream for this huge free resource designed to help anyone who can access the internet to learn more about how to interpret and work with dreams. (You can volunteer as a guest here.)

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2012 Wake up call

2012 Wake up call

What’s your recurring dream? If you’ve been following my blog, listening to my podcasts, and reading my books, and you’re still experiencing a recurring dream, today’s post is your wake up call. It’s time to put what you’ve been learning into action if you want to enjoy life changing results in 2012!

Let’s review the basics:

1. A dream is the experience you have, during sleep, while your brain processes your conscious and unconscious experiences of the last 24-48 hours.

2. Think of this processing as like updating your hard drive. Your brain and mind compare your latest experiences to all your past experiences, drawing conclusions – beliefs – about how life works. Mostly you consolidate your oldest beliefs. Sometimes you modify your beliefs. Sometimes you completely overwrite an old belief and wake up with a transformed personal view of how the world works.

Imagine a painter trying to capture your mind’s fast processing of experiences, emotions, and beliefs, as an abstract picture.

Imagine a painter trying to capture your mind’s fast processing of experiences, emotions, and beliefs, as an abstract picture.

3. During dreaming, you are more in touch with your unconscious mind, which is why dreams seem surreal. Imagine a painter trying to capture your mind’s fast processing of experiences, emotions, and beliefs, as an abstract picture. She might use metaphor, analogy, colours to represent emotions, shapes to represent belief structures, any number of creative techniques to help you ‘get the picture’ – or, at least, to store it in your archives under ‘update on how life works’.

4. The magic begins when you know how to ‘get the picture’ – how to interpret a dream – because this helps you to understand your unique mindset. You get to understand your unconscious beliefs, both the ones that work for you and the ones that work against you in your everyday life.

5. You can then see which beliefs need to be changed to get the kind of waking life results you desire. If you stop there, you probably won’t see those results. You need to apply a deeper magic – dream alchemy.

Dream alchemy is a way of working with your unique dream symbols to reprogram your unconscious beliefs.

Dream alchemy is a way of working with your unique dream symbols to reprogram your unconscious beliefs.

6. Dream alchemy is a process you can use to transform an unconscious belief. It’s a way of working with your unique dream symbols to reprogram your unconscious. It works because your unconscious mind relates to your personal dream symbols – after all, it created them!

7. Now, back to your recurring dream: Since dreams reflect the last 24-48 hours, your recurring dream reflects a recurring waking life issue. Have you noticed that most recurring dreams are unhappy, frustrating, or unresolved? That’s because they reflect an unhappy, frustrating, or unresolved issue in your life.

8. To resolve that issue, apply the formula: Dream interpretation + Dream alchemy = Success + an end to your recurring dream.

Ok, that’s your wake up call. Do your dream alchemy to make 2012 your best year ever!

Listen as DK asks me about his recurring dream of driving a car that goes way out of control ... and more.

Listen as DK asks me about his recurring dream of driving a car that goes way out of control … and more.

On a more light-hearted level, here’s an hour’s entertainment about recurring dreams. DK, host of At the Watercooler on Z Talk Radio, invited me onto his show. In this podcast, he asks me about his recurring dream of driving a car that goes way out of control, and, excited by the discovery, moves on to ask me about another recurring dream featuring buildings.

Listeners ask about their dreams and we cover lucid dreaming, falling and floating dreams, a variety of toilet dreams, dreams of snakes, dream sharing, and the question of astral travelling. Oh, and we also talk about dream alchemy and much more.

Listen here. Note: the interview starts halfway through the podcast, so move the slider halfway, or enjoy DK’s interview with the guest before me, Jane Congdon, author of It Started With Dracula.

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Episode 71 The Dream Show: Glimmers of gold

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A new podcast every Friday. Listen here or subscribe on iTunes.

Episode 71 of our free weekly podcast, THE DREAM SHOW, is now up.

What’s the link between Inception, the movie, and Dream Alchemy?

Inception is about entering into a person’s dream and changing the storyline to create a changed waking life outcome, while Dream Alchemy is about changing the storyline of your own dream, once you’ve woken up, to create a changed waking life outcome.

In Inception, the dreamer’s changed waking life outcome is manipulated by the intruder. In Dream Alchemy, the changed waking life outcome is one the dreamer chooses.

In the first part of this podcast we look at two of the questions Inception raises about dreaming: (i) can we control our dreams? (ii) can we control other people’s dreams?

In the second part we look at ways to measure your success when you do dream alchemy. On the way to achieving the big waking life changes there are many indicators that the alchemy is working, and it’s important to acknowledge, endorse and celebrate these ‘glimmers of gold’ you meet along the way.

Oh, and I answer listener Fran’s question about whether you should apply alchemy to every dream: now, there’s a pot of gold. Enjoy.

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Inception: Can you control a dream?

Inception, the movie, raises many questions about dreams and reality, and the question of controlling dreams is top of the list.

Inception, the movie, raises many questions about dreams and reality, and the question of controlling dreams is top of the list.

Can you control your dreams?

Can you control other people’s dreams?

Have you seen the movie Inception, directed by Christopher Nolan and starring Leonardo DiCaprio, released in recent weeks? It’s about a team of people who control other people’s dreams and get them to reveal their secrets.

The team is asked to go one stage further: to control a target’s dream and implant an idea, so that when that target wakes up, he believes the idea is his own, and acts on it. (It makes a great story, but there are easier ways to do this, such as hypnosis, NLP, and suggestion wrapped in analogy.)

I won’t spoil your enjoyment of the movie by saying any more, except that the fiction raises many questions about dreams and reality, and the question of controlling dreams is top of the list.

So, can you control your dreams? Yes. I’ll tell you how. But let’s look at the other question first!

Can you control other people’s dreams?

You can’t control another person’s dream, but you can certainly influence it.

If the room temperature suddenly becomes very cold, the dream weather may change to snow.

If the room temperature suddenly becomes very cold, the dream weather may change to snow.

One way is to manipulate the dreamer’s environment. Dreams often incorporate external stimuli. For example, if the room temperature suddenly becomes very cold, the dream weather may change to snow, or the dreamer may dream of being in a refrigerated room, or of getting goosebumps, thinking a ghost is in the room.

Have you ever woken to discover the strange sound in your dream was really your alarm clock beeping, a phone ringing, or a siren screaming? Here’s one of mine that will make you laugh.

So although you have no control over what will happen in a person’s dream, you can influence the dream and you may successfully influence it along the direction of your intention. I’m sure you don’t need me to warn you not to do this unless your dreamer invites you to experiment. It’s unethical.

If you do something to challenge a person’s understanding of their world, it’s highly likely that the challenge will be processed in the dreamer’s dream either that night or the night after. Our dreams process our conscious and unconscious experiences of the last 24-48 hours as we continually try to make sense of our world. It’s a bit like updating your hard drive: updating your thoughts and beliefs about your world based on all your past experiences, emotions and memories. Anything new and challenging is top of the list for processing in a dream. So while you can’t control a person’s dreams, you can certainly influence them, intentionally or unintentially.

Can you control your own dreams? Yes, but it takes dedication to achieve this! This is what to do:

To take control in a dream, you need to be aware that you are dreaming. Usually we think a dream is real. We have no idea that we have a waking reality until the moment we wake up and realise that what seemed so real was, in fact, a dream. When you realise that you are dreaming and continue to dream, knowing that you also have a waking life, you are ‘lucid dreaming’. That’s the point at which you can take control and drect your dream. You might want to fly, or walk through a wall, or practice something you’d like to achieve in waking life. But first, you need to become lucid, so how can you do this?

In the movie, Cobb had a spinning top totem to test whether he was dreaming or awake. He could control the top and keep it spinning in a dream.

In the movie, Cobb had a spinning top totem to test whether he was dreaming or awake. He could control the top and keep it spinning in a dream.

Choose a totem. This might be a new bracelet you wear on your wrist, a special pebble you carry in your pocket, a fingernail you paint blue – anything! Look at your totem every half hour throughout the day, and ask yourself: ‘Am I dreaming?’ Seriously consider the question. Look around for evidence that you are dreaming. Then apply the acid test: levitate. If you don’t levitate, you’re probably not dreaming. If you DO levitate, then you absolutely know you are dreaming. That’s the point at which you can take control of your lucid dream. (Note: choose a safe test like levitating rather than a dangerous test like leaping from a high place expecting to fly!)

Why do you need a totem? Your dream processes your experiences of the last 24-48 hours, so looking at that new totem every half hour is a weird enough experience for your dreaming mind to prioritise. Your dream is likely to feature the mysterious totem. Although your dream totem may look a bit different to your actual totem, it should work to prompt you to ask yourself that key question: Am I dreaming?

Well, are you? Can you levitate?

Watch me describing this on Sunrise, Channel 7:

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Extracting wisdom

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Extracting wisdom

Open wide ...

Open wide …

I’ve just had a tooth extracted, a back molar. It was a big deal: my first extraction since childhood. I know dentistry has come a long way in the last 40-50 years, but painful memories can loom large.

“But you’re so calm and cool for root canal, drilling and filling,” said my dentist. “Why so anxious this time?”

“Childhood memories run deep,” I said. “Turn up the gas.”

I have my plier-wielding, childhood dentist to thank for my usual cool and calm. I remember telling myself, as the early 1960s drill plundered into my milk white tooth, that the pain was nothing compared to being eaten by a lion in a jungle. It worked. Instant calm.

That old dentist even taught me a bit about dreams and reality when he knocked me out with gas to remove a particularly painful tooth. I had a kind of lucid dream. I was tracing a maze, the kind you got in kids’ puzzle books, and every time the dental assistant lifted one of my eyelids to check the anaesthesia, the dentist’s face appeared in my maze. I was out and not out, dreaming and awake, listening to the conversation, the crack and snap of my tooth being lifted out of its swollen socket.

So I was surprised to feel so anxious, last week.

Of course the tooth was extracted painlessly. It was days later that something really strange happened.

I remembered a story I had told many times throughout my life but had somehow mysteriously forgotten since agreeing to have this extraction. When I was 20, I had a wisdom tooth removed. The dentist cursed: my tooth had a long, hooked root. Too much blood spurted in front of my eyes, and apologies were made for not booking me into a dental hospital for a full anaesthetic.

No wonder I was anxious this time round. No matter how wisely my unconscious mind tried to claim that memory, to tuck it away for just the time it took to get me into and out of that dentist’s chair, it still made itself felt, a niggling anxiety.

Still, I’m doing pretty well considering I’m running on 75% wisdom according to my dental chart.

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Episode 71 The Dream Show Glimmers of gold

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