Category Archives: TV, radio, print

Jane Teresa’s media appearances – television, radio, streaming radio, print.

Video: Talking dreams on The Today Show

Jane Teresa Anderson The Today show 19 June 2014

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I was on The Today Show (Nine, national television) yesterday, talking about recurring dreams with hosts Karl Stefanovic and Lisa Wilkinson, who each shared their recurring dreams. The Today Show posted the upcoming segment to their Facebook page, asking for dreams for me to interpret on air. Over 290 dreams were submitted, showing yet again how fascinated people are by their dreams.  Enjoy and do share.

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Paula Abdul’s dream

Dream analysis on Studio Ten show

I was talking with Paula Abdul and Ita Buttrose on Studio 10 this morning about their dreams and what they mean, as well as looking at some common dream themes. What’s Paula’s recurring dream? What was Ita’s epic dream all about?

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Interpreting dreams on The Morning Show, Channel 7

Here’s the video from my segment on The Morning Show (Channel Seven, national) this morning, with presenters Kylie and James. We look at video clips of people filmed in the street yesterday describing their dreams, and discuss what they mean and how we can apply the insight we gain from looking into dreams to make our life experiences better.

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Episode 143 A platter of dreams

Thank you for your help

A platter of dreams

Welcome to the first episode recorded in my new studio! I wonder if you can hear any difference. It’s a bigger space, so I can stand at the microphone and wave my arms and hands around as I talk to you. Even though you can’t see me, it feels good to get my whole body involved in painting the picture I want to communicate to you.

I was talking to my two and a half year old granddaughter on the phone last week. “Look Grandma!” Isobel said, “Can you see the new fairy garden I made?” She was rather perplexed that I couldn’t. She has a rich imagination, so I guess she could see me in her mind’s eye and – believing her vision to be accurate – assumed I could see her pointing to her fairy garden. So you’ll excuse me for getting excited about my new studio because I can use my hands to show you what I mean.

The Dream Show with Jane Teresa AndersonI’ve been told that communicating kinaesthetically – gesturing with hands and body – is possibly a genetic thing related to my European heritage. What’s your communication style? What’s your preferred medium for absorbing information, for being inspired? I ask because in this episode I bring you a platter of dreams and dream topics that I have recently recorded to video or blogged about, and I wonder what difference listening makes to you personally over watching or reading. Even if you’ve read these articles before, do you understand the nuances more when you listen?

What’s on the dream platter? I’m not telling. You’ll need to press play and listen. Enjoy, be inspired, and please share.

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What does dreaming of losing teeth mean?

What does dreaming of losing teeth mean

“My recurring dream is gross. I lose all my teeth,” said Chloe, calling into the dream segment on the PowerPack Breakfast show. “How common is this type of dream, and what does it mean?”

I’ve been doing this segment long enough now for the show’s presenters, Steve and Abbey, to kick off with good questions. They know that our dream symbols are personal.

“Do you grind your teeth?” asked Steve. “Do you have kids around you losing their teeth?”

“Do you drink too much coke?” asked Abbey.

“What else happens in the dream?” I asked.

“I don’t remember any other details. It’s just always gross.”

Chloe’s first question was easy to answer. Dreams about losing teeth are extremely common, although no two dreams – and no two dream meanings – are the same.

If the sense of loss in the dream is worrying or traumatic, the dream is processing feelings, issues, or beliefs about loss that have been triggered during the last couple of days. The details of the dream – what happened before, during, and after the loss – provide the information that puts those feelings, issues, and beliefs about loss into context and offers the basis for therapeutic work where needed.

So why dream about losing teeth? Why not losing hair, a purse or wallet, a car, a job, a baby? Look beyond dreams of losing teeth, and you’ll see that loss is a very common dream theme. (Next month I’ll blog about another caller, Cathy, who asked about her recurring dream of losing her hair and going bald.)

It all comes down to working out what the dreamer associates with teeth, and the tricky bit is that this association may well be unconscious.

Before we go there, Steve and Abbey were right to ask the questions about grinding teeth and drinking too much coke, as external stimuli and body sensations can work their way into our dreams. So if you grind your teeth while you sleep, your dreams may detect the pressure on your gums and process that feeling into your dream, though if you’re an habitual nightly teeth grinder your dreaming mind is likely to dismiss this sensation as normal, okay, nothing worth processing a dream. If your teeth are beginning to rot due to coke or other factors, this new information (pain, discomfort, niggling feelings of guilt) may find its way into your dreams in the shape of losing teeth, but it may equally take dream shape as a crumbling wall, rotting fencepost, painful boil, or any other personal symbol that your dreaming mind engages to express the sensation or feeling.

Steve’s question about being around kids who are losing teeth was an important one. On the surface, a dream of losing teeth might reflect the dreamer’s experiences of helping her children through this period. On a deeper level, we all have memories of losing our milk teeth as children, and seeing children around us go through this can trigger both conscious and unconscious experiences from our childhood that end up being processed in our dreams. Losing milk teeth tends to correspond to those years when, as a child, you’re vulnerable to people’s reactions to your gummy gaps and inevitable lisps, and when your current waking life brings up similar vulnerabilities and lapses in confidence your dreaming mind may come up with the ideal symbol: losing teeth.

If you have this dream, what do teeth represent for you?

All Chloe could tell us (and, being radio, we only had a few minutes to look at Chloe’s dream), was that there were no details other than losing teeth and this being “gross”.

The word gross intrigued me. Why did she choose this word? As a dream analyst (and keen reader of the unconscious mind in waking life too), I knew “gross” was not a random choice.

“How important are your teeth in your life, Chloe?” I asked.

“Well, appearance is not the most important thing, but my teeth are perfect, no fillings, nice and straight,” she began.

“Well, appearance is not the most important thing, but my teeth are perfect, no fillings, nice and straight,” she began.

“Well, appearance is not the most important thing, but my teeth are perfect, no fillings, nice and straight,” she began. “They’re important for functions like eating, but mostly they’re about image. I think how gross it would be to lose teeth.”

Immediately I noticed opposites: perfect, gross.

“This is probably about a situation in your life where you value being perfect, but you fear losing some of this edge, this perfection,” I offered.

Chloe related to the interpretation. In a consultation or therapy situation we would explore the underlying beliefs Chloe holds about the value of perfection, discover their origin, their structure, how much they drive Chloe’s day to day life, whether they inspire her or limit her, and help her to understand herself and her life more deeply as a result. Our unconscious beliefs, good and bad, can run deep and affect not only the structure but also the potential of our lives. We would then move on to change those beliefs, if Chloe wished, and rebuild them into more supportive beliefs using dream alchemy.

In other words, I guess we’d do the deep dentistry. Root canals and all. But we’d build beautiful, natural, healthy teeth with healthy roots – if we’re following the analogy – rather than do a spot of cosmetic dentistry with superficial veneer.

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Does my dream mean bad luck?

Does my dream mean bad luck

“I dreamed I was jousting on horseback, and my opponent stabbed me in the chest with his lance,” said Mike, who called the PowerPack Breakfast show last week to ask me about his dream. “I fell out of bed with the impact,” he laughed. “What does it mean? Am I going to have bad luck?

As Mike was telling me about his dream, I was reminded of Alfred Maury, a 19th century French scholar and physician who famously dreamed that he was caught up in the French Revolution. The dream was long and complex, and in the closing sequence he was led to the guillotine to be executed. He heard the blade coming down, felt it touch the back of his neck, and saw his head roll … and at that exact moment the headboard of his bed came crashing down onto the back of his neck and woke him up. On the basis of this experience, Maury argued that dreams are instantaneous, and often related to external stimuli.  He believed the pain of the headboard hitting his neck created the whole dream in a flash.

Alfred Maury believed the pain of the headboard hitting his neck created the whole guillotine dream in a flash.

Alfred Maury believed the pain of the headboard hitting his neck created the whole guillotine dream in a flash. (It is now known that dreams occur in real time.)

His theory about dreams being instantaneous has since been disproved. Dreams are known to occur in real time. You may dream that you fly to the moon, but think of your dreams as using similar techniques as movies, capturing the story and feeling of a long journey in several minutes of cleverly cut footage.

Mike wasn’t pushed out of bed by an errant bedpost, or – as far as we know – by an elbow in the chest from his wife, or by a sudden internal painful sensation such as heartburn or panic, although external stimuli can and do work their way into the dream already in progress. No, Mike’s dream was symbolic, and the reason he fell out of bed when the dream lance plunged into his chest was most likely because the shock began to wake up his physical body. Usually, when we sleep, our motor nerves are inhibited to prevent us from moving and acting out our dreams. As we begin to wake up, we break through this REM atonia and our mobility returns.

Let’s get back to the aspect of dreams that I find compelling and interesting: why did Mike have his dream, and what does it mean?

Mike and his wife live near a castle, and they had attended a medieval re-enactment jousting tournament the day before the dream, but they had been to the same event in previous years, so why dream about it this time, and why such a dramatic dream?

 The jousting tournament resonated at a deeper emotional level within Mike. It struck a chord, and his dreaming mind got to work on it.

The jousting tournament resonated at a deeper emotional level within Mike. It struck a chord, and his dreaming mind got to work on it.

Dreams process our conscious and unconscious experiences of the previous 24-48 hours, particularly anything that’s emotionally charged – excuse the pun. This year, there was something about the jousting that resonated at a deeper emotional level within Mike. It struck a chord, and his dreaming mind got to work on it.

“How did you feel in the dream?” I asked Mike.

His humour kicked in. “Like I was at the pointy end of the stick.”

His unconscious mind had spoken loud and clear. “In the day or two before the dream, was there a situation where you felt you were at the pointy end of the stick?” I asked.

Dreams – especially for those blessed with a sense of verbal humour, or who enjoy word play – often portray visual clichés. Look for them in dreams. Giggle, and be enlightened.

We only had a few minutes to talk about his dream, as this was breakfast radio.

“Does my dream mean bad luck?” asked Mike, no doubt picturing more of that pointy-end-of-the-stick feeling in days to come.

No. It’s not the job of dreams to preview good or bad luck. A dream’s job is to process our experiences, compare them to our past experiences and beliefs about life, and update our beliefs accordingly. A dream’s job is to help us make sense of our world, based on our personal experiences.

“My wife doesn’t fancy me wearing armour,” said Mike.

“My wife doesn’t fancy me wearing armour,” said Mike.

Mike’s job is to understand what his dream reveals about his mindset and decide whether that mindset is going to serve him well. How does he normally respond when he feels like he’s on the pointy end of a stick in life? Does he fight back, defend himself, go into attack mode, or withdraw into his armour? How do these responses work for him? Why does he respond in these ways? Why does he feel vulnerable? Might there be better ways to handle conflict, like negotiation or a heart to heart talk, depending on the circumstances? If we’d had an hour to explore his dream and his life, we would have found answers to these questions, insights, and solutions, and we would have applied dream alchemy to reprogram his mindset if required.

Whether you see life as dealing you good or bad luck, it’s how you respond and handle it that makes a difference. “Your dream can help you understand how you deal with conflict,” I said to Mike, “and find ways that get better results all round.”

Mike’s humour kicked in again, “My wife doesn’t fancy me wearing armour.” Now that’s a good thought to take forward.

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Dream Alchemy in Phnom Penh

The Advisor interview with Jane Teresa Anderson by Phoenix Jay

I was in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, last month, giving a workshop on Dream Therapy to creative arts therapists, which attracted Phoenix Jay of Phnom Penh’s The Advisor to interview me for their cover story. It’s a broad ranging yet deep interview, which you can read in full here – it includes a discussion of trauma, Jung, Freud, and an interpretation of Phoenix’s recurring dream and her response. I’ve picked out some extracts for you as a taster:

Extract

Jane Teresa:
If someone comes to me with a dream, my prime focus at first is to answer their questions. Why did you have this dream? Let’s have a look at it and explore it together. Let’s discover from your dream more about your mindset; about your unconscious mind, about how your past experiences are influencing the way you’re experiencing life now. Let’s put a window on that, without judgement. The next thing I have in mind is, whatever this dream is about, I want to help that person to experience a bigger and better life because of what they understand about themselves through their dreams.

Extract

Jane Teresa:
Say you told me about a dream and I said: ‘You’ve got an unconscious belief that you’re really sick and you’ll never be well.’ You could go away and do a whole New Age affirmation – ‘I’m really healthy; I’m fighting fit’ – but we all know that doesn’t work.

Phoenix Jay:
I didn’t want to be the one to point that out.

Jane Teresa:

There’s no point talking to your unconscious mind using rational everyday language because it’s not going to understand.

There’s no point talking to your unconscious mind using rational everyday language because it’s not going to understand.

[Laughs] It makes us feel good but generally it doesn’t work. And the reason it generally doesn’t work is because you’ve got an unconscious belief to the contrary. Because your unconscious mind is so strong, it usually drives you more than your conscious mind. So in that somewhat silly example, just to keep things simple, if you were someone who wasn’t particularly looking after your health, it would be because you’ve got unconscious beliefs: ‘If I was healthy I’d have to do this, that and the other. I want to be the victim. I’m going to make sure I’m unhealthy.’ In reprogramming that, you can then be released from it: ‘Why did I think it was so important to be sick? That’s stupid, isn’t it? I’ve got a new unconscious belief that’s supporting my conscious intention and my conscious mind.’ So you start creating a healthy lifestyle for yourself. You wouldn’t be seeking a cure for your health, finances or whatever if they were all really good – and the reason they’re not good is because they’re being unconsciously driven by something else. There’s no point talking to your unconscious mind using rational everyday language because it’s not going to understand, but if you use the language of your unconscious mind – your dream symbols – you can really create quite stunning changes and there’s where I get really excited about working with people.

Extract

Phoenix Jay:
So, the big question: does the key to the future of human evolution lie in breaking down the barriers between the conscious and
unconscious mind?

Jane Teresa:

Delphic Oracle. Know thyself: We’d treat each other with greater kindness and compassion and forgiveness – and with that, everything changes.

Know thyself: We’d treat each other with greater kindness and compassion and forgiveness – and with that, everything changes.

One hundred percent! If you could say 101% and it made sense, I’d say 1,000,000%. It’s been touched upon by so many cultures throughout history. The one that springs to mind is the Delphic Oracle from Ancient Greece. It’s the place you went to consult the oracle on your future. Above the door, in Greek, is a sign that says: ‘Know thy self.’ Look within first. If we could all understand our unconscious minds more thoroughly and in that gain understanding of our greater being and what life is really all about, then we wouldn’t act in the ways we do. Even if everyone was just a metaphorical drop of water in the great ocean of life, if every little drop of water – drop by drop by drop – got it and looked within, we would all treat each other so differently. We’d treat each other with greater kindness and compassion and forgiveness – and with that, everything changes.

Read full interview

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Dream drummer

Dream drummer

“Three times this week I dreamed I was the new drummer for American band Blink 182,” said Brad, calling PowerFM’s PowerPack Breakfast show where I was interpreting dreams.

The drums were bike powered, and the faster Brad peddled, the better the drums sounded. Although he can’t play the drums in waking life, he was a brilliant drummer in his dreams, and the crowds loved it almost as much as he did.

There was no performance anxiety. It wasn’t one of those dreams where you’re asked to perform but it all goes wrong, or you forget the music, or the drums turn to jelly. Brad simply stepped up to the drums, got on the bike, peddled away, and turned in a great performance.

A feel-good dream, three times in one week, must mean something good. But what?

Being radio, there was no time to spend an hour deeply exploring Brad’s dream, but there was time enough in the few minutes we had to get to the main point and give Brad something meaningful to help him forward.

Travis Barker Blink 182

Blink 182 drummer, Travis Barker, was unable to join them for the Australian tour because of his fear of flying.

I needed to be filled in on the details. Blink 182 was heading to Australia on tour that week, but their drummer, Travis Barker, was unable to join them because of his fear of flying. He was one of only two survivors of a plane crash in 2008. He lost two of his best friends in the crash, and the other survivor died the next year following an accidental drug overdose.

Travis Barker was replaced by Brooks Wackerman of Tenacious D in the waking life Australian tour, and by Brad in his dreams.

In Brad’s dream, he had no fear. No fear of playing the drums, no fear of flying. He stepped up to the plate and peddled his bike, and the more legwork he put in, the better he played.

My radio time was running out. “There’s somewhere in your life where you’re scared, but once you commit to it and put in the legwork, you can achieve it and you will enjoy it.”

“Spot on, dream lady,” Brad chuckled.

Brooks Wackerman

Travis Barker was replaced by Brooks Wackerman of Tenacious D in the waking life Australian tour, and by Brad in his dreams.

Our dreams reflect our conscious and unconscious experiences, feelings, and beliefs, and more often than not our unconscious holds us back. In a dream like Brad’s, his unconscious perspective was supportive. Whatever fear had been holding Brad back, something had shifted during the week of his three dreams. Maybe the fear was still there, but the motivation to overcome it kicked in. Or maybe Brad released the fear that week. We didn’t have time to discover more, but Brad now has his formula. He has an opportunity, his unconscious mind is supportive, and all he needs to do is turn up and put in the legwork.

Of course it’s not about drumming. No doubt Brad had heard about Travis Barker’s fear of flying – the media had the story – and unconsciously related to Travis missing an opportunity due to fear. It resonated with his own history of missing an opportunity due to fear, and when his dreaming mind processed this it naturally came up with the perfect dream metaphor.

Legwork

He has an opportunity, his unconscious mind is supportive, and all he needs to do is turn up and put in the legwork.

Brad’s “Spot on, dream lady,” tells us that Brad knows what the opportunity is and what to do about it.

Brad could add some dream alchemy to enhance his confidence. He could visualise peddling that dream bike, drumming those dream drums, tuning back into the dream feeling of enjoyment, and the more he does this, the more his confidence will grow, and suddenly he will find himself doing the legwork that brings enjoyment and fulfilment into his waking life.

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Dream Alchemy ebook published by Hachette today!

Dream Alchemy ebook published Hachette Dec 2012

I’m delighted to announce that Hachette have just published my book, Dream Alchemy, in digital format, available as an instant download from:

Amazon as a Kindle book here

iTunes as an iBook here

and at GoogleBooks here.

Enjoy and do please share! Thank you.

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Episode 133 The Dream Show: Dream stories and breakfast radio

Thank you for your help

Episode 133 The Dream Show: Dream stories and breakfast radio

Dreams of worms, snakes, rats, ghosts, and bare bottoms, and what they mean, have all been topics on breakfast radio or drive radio when I’ve been on air as the dream expert, taking calls from listeners or interpreting presenters’ dreams. I enjoy radio work, and over the last couple of decades have discussed, interpreted, or bantered about thousands of callers’ dreams over many different radio formats. Whether the approach is light-hearted or deep and meaningful, there’s always something to get across to the listeners, a dream interpretation tip, an insight into how to look at their dreams.

Radio is in the moment, so to extend my contribution I sometimes blog about a dream we’ve briefly talked about on radio, fleshing out the interpretation and the story.

The Dream Show, a free monthly podcast with Jane Teresa AndersonIn this episode of The Dream Show, episode 133, I bring you some of these radio dreams and stories, so you’ll hear all about worms, snakes, rats, ghosts, and bare bottoms, and what they mean, and much more.

In this episode I also bring you into my world as a radio dream expert, share a little of the whys and wherefores, the fun, and what can and can’t be done within the medium to contribute to the understanding of dreams.

As we approach the end of the year, and as you are hopefully enjoying some time away from work during the festive season, this episode is designed for leisurely but insightful listening. Enjoy and please share.

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