Category Archives: Dream Sight articles

Jane Teresa’s articles on dreams, dream interpretation and dream alchemy.

Dream interpretation: Theme alchemy

Here’s an example from my life. It’s the story of three waves.

No, it’s not a drunken, lisped take on ‘dream alchemy’. It’s a way of reading across your dreams, instead of considering each dream individually. It helps you to find light when you need it most.

Here’s an example from my life. It’s the story of three waves.

Once upon a time, I had three dreams about tsunamis. Each dream was on a different night, spaced over one week, and each dream was different from the last.

As a child, I often had the classic tsunami dream – a very common dream theme for many people. Generally, this dream theme involves running away, or trying to run away, from a tsunami or huge tidal wave.

You can glimpse the meaning of a dream by summarising it in one sentence, starting with the words ‘I feel’ and including the word ‘something’. Most people who have the classic tsunami dream come up with something like this:

“I feel threatened by something huge and overwhelming that I cannot escape.”

This one sentence summary usually applies to your waking life in the day or two leading up to the dream. Like most tsunami dreamers, my childhood dream came up whenever I felt overwhelmed by issues I didn’t know how to address. Turn away and run seems the only option, but, as dream after dream goes to show, tsunamis and unaddressed issues catch up with you in the end.

My adult tsunami dream trilogy went like this:

Tsunami dream number 1

In the first dream of the series, I knew a tsunami was coming. I was on a beach and had a foreboding feeling. I warned everyone of the distant tsunami, hoping advance warning would save them. It felt good to give the warning in plenty of time.

My dream summary was “I feel thankful I have advance warning of something overwhelming coming my way.”

I could relate this to my waking life. I could feel the threat of an emotionally charged issue gathering force on the horizon. I knew from experience that you can’t escape an issue by running from it, but that you can diffuse it, and escape damage, by working out a solution to the issue. Thankful for this, I applied myself to possible solutions.

Tsunami dream number 2

The second tsunami dream came a few days later. The dream started in the same way, but then, as people listened to my warning, I saw the tsunami on the horizon start to recede. It was still big, and it would still roll on in up the beach and beyond, but the potential damage was much reduced.

My dream summary was “I feel relieved that something that felt overwhelming now seems a little less threatening.”

I could relate this to my waking life since I had spent the previous few days looking at possible solutions to this issue. This had made me feel more empowered, more capable of defusing the issue, though I wasn’t quite there yet. The dream gave me hope that I was on track.

Tsunami dream number 3

A few days later, I had the third tsunami dream. In the dream, I was sitting by a river when a whale swam by, trailing a large V-shaped ripple in its wake. I watched the ripple gathering momentum as it spread from the point where the whale’s fin broke the surface of the water. I looked closer at the fin, noticing, in the dream, that it looked like a shark’s fin but knowing, absolutely, that this was a whale. Caught in the moment I almost forgot to jump up as the ripple hit the river bank, spilled over the edge, and splashed over my legs before subsiding. I danced about at the river’s edge, like a child playing in the waves, happy, laughing loudly enough to wake myself up from my dream.

My dream summary was “I feel happy that something that appeared to be ominous was really something beautiful.”

I could relate this to my waking life as I had looked for the positive in the negative – looked for a win-win solution to the issue – and, in so doing, transformed the shark into a whale, the negative view into a positive one, the overwhelming deluge into a ripple of joy. (Did you spot the dream pun – the ripple in the ‘wake’? I was ‘awakened’ to see a ripple in place of a tsunami, a whale in place of a shark. Perhaps there was even a V for victory in that V-shaped ripple. And doesn’t laughter come in ripples?)

I danced about at the river’s edge, like a child playing in the waves, happy, laughing loudly enough to wake myself up from my dream.

I danced about at the river’s edge, like a child playing in the waves, happy, laughing loudly enough to wake myself up from my dream.

But where is the Theme Alchemy in all of this? Haven’t I just done the usual thing and interpreted three individual dreams? Didn’t I promise, at the start of this article, to show you a way of reading across your dreams, instead of considering each dream individually?

To read across your dreams, select a number of dreams on the same theme. In this example, I chose three dreams on the tsunami theme. My dreams were close together, all taking place within one week, but you can choose dreams from any time period. If you have been keeping a record of all your dreams, you might like to select all your dreams on a certain theme from the past year. Or you might just like to stay vigilant for a run of dreams like mine.

The next step is to summarise each dream using the method I outlined in my example – the one sentence summary starting with “I feel” and including the word “something”.

Then place these one sentence summaries together to produce a continuous reading – a reading across your dreams. Here are mine, as an example:

“I feel thankful I have advance warning of something overwhelming coming my way. I feel relieved that something that felt overwhelming now seems a little less threatening. I feel happy that something that appeared to be ominous was really something beautiful.”

Reading across your dreams (dreams on a similar theme) shows you how you are progressing with an aspect of your life. In my example, I was progressing well, tuning into a negative, ominous feeling, taking heed of the warning, deciding to do something about it, and, finally, settling on the solution of looking for the positive in the negative. Once I found the positive, the negative disappeared.

You take a reading like this and apply it to other life situations. In my case, I learned to see the whale in every apparent shark, long after the situation that triggered this dream trilogy.

When I woke from my third dream, I did a dream alchemy practice. I took the good ending and amped it up. I visualised the whale, the ripple and the happy sensation of the ripple splashing over my legs. I repeated the visualisation over the next weeks until my unconscious mind firmly and automatically responded to every shark by looking for the whale.

Faced with a difficult situation you can ask, “Where is the whale in this?

Faced with a difficult situation you can ask, “Where is the whale in this?

You can also simply turn an insight like this into a contemplative question. Faced with a difficult situation you can ask, “Where is the whale in this?”

Sometimes, when you read across your dreams, you’ll see they keep going round in circles, rather than progressing. You can learn from such a dream reading that you are not progressing. Take action and, when you are awake, do this dream alchemy practice: visualise changing the ending of your dream. Eventually your dreaming mind will produce a dream reflecting your progress. Keep reading across your dreams on the same theme to monitor – and celebrate – your progress.

Theme Alchemy is applying dream alchemy practices, like visualisation, to a run of dreams on the same theme. It’s about reading across dreams on a similar theme to gauge your progress, and then applying alchemy practices to hasten that progress. It’s about finding a chink of light in a series of dark dreams, and then widening that chink until enough light comes pouring in to show you the way through. Once you’ve done this, you have a magic formula ready to apply if ever that old dream theme reappears. In my case, whenever I have even a trickle of a tsunami dream, I wake up and start looking for the whale in the shark, the positive in the negative.

If you keep a dream journal and you have one or more recurring dream themes, you might like to copy those dreams into separate journals – Theme Journals. You might have a Tsunami Journal, an Animal Journal, or a Plane Journal, for example.  Practice the art of reading across the dreams in your Theme Journals, until you see the light.

[Copyright Jane Teresa Anderson, December 2007. First published as a Dream Sight article.]

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What if?

 

A mosaic dream.
A man dreamed he was crawling over a mosaic floor, checking for missing tiles. The job seemed endless.
What if … he climbed the stairs and looked down on the mosaic floor instead of crawling over it? Would the missing tiles be easier to spot?

We’ll come back to Mosaic Man and his dream later, but to get the most from this article, first play some more What If with me.

A woman dreamed she was in a bar and no-one was serving her.

What if … she walked round to the other side of the counter and served herself?

A man dreamed he was drowning.

What if … he inflated his life jacket?
What if … he started to swim?
What if … he removed his heavy shoes?
What if … he let go?

A woman dreamed she was late for her plane.

What if … she phoned the airport and asked the plane to wait?
What if … she decided to miss the plane and choose another destination?
What if … she remembered she was the pilot, so she’d go in her own time?

A man dreamed he had more bags than he could carry.

What if … he put down some of the bags, and travelled lighter?
What if … he hired a truck to deliver the bags?
What if … he distributed the bags among the people he was travelling with?
What if … he looked inside the bags and re-evaluated the contents?
What if … he asked himself why he was carrying the bags in the first place?

Are you getting the hang of this? Before reading further, go back and add some more What ifs to all the above dreams. See how many What ifs you can think up.

A man dreamed he woke up to find himself in a prison cell.

What if … he started to dig an escape tunnel?
What if … he decided to spend his long years in jail writing his memoirs?
What if … he decided to write to people he had wronged to make amends?
What if … he discovered the door was unlocked, and left?
What if … he scolded himself for falling asleep on the job, finished cleaning the cell and went home?

A woman dreamed she came across a fork in the road.

What if … she took the left turning?
What if … she took the right turning?
What if … she left the road and went cross-country?
What if … she tossed a coin to decide on her next step?
What if … she followed the footprints in the snow?
What if … she picked up the fork?

Aha! Now, did you beat me to that last line? On the left hand I couldn’t resist the joke, and on the right hand I wanted to remind you that when we’re talking dreams, anything is possible. Dreams love puns, so to dream of finding a fork (cutlery) on the road may symbolise reaching a fork (decision point).

It never occurred to Thirsty Lady to serve herself.

It never occurred to Thirsty Lady to serve herself.

More importantly, dreams reveal our personal perceptions and understandings of life, so when you ask What if questions about a dream make sure you question your perception of the dream situation as well as alternative outcomes.

The final What if for Prison Man, for example, questioned his perception of the dream situation. What if he wasn’t imprisoned at all, but had simply momentarily forgotten he was cleaning the cell, and was always free to go?

How can all of this help you to interpret your dreams and introduce positive changes into your life?

Most dreams are metaphors – stories that parallel your waking life situation. (When you sleep, your right brain is more active than your left [logical] brain, and it expresses itself in metaphors.) The trick is to find the situation in your waking life described by your dream metaphor.

Mosaic Man, for example, thought about his dream of endlessly crawling over a mosaic floor, checking for missing tiles. He could see the link with his work situation. He was a business owner and had recently lost several members of staff to a competing business. For months he had been preoccupied with these losses, trying to work out why they were leaving and who might leave next. He saw the mosaic floor as his staff network, the foundation of his business, and he saw the individual lost tiles as the lost staff. He could see from his dream that he was so focussed on the details of individual staff losses, that he was losing sight of the big picture. When he thought about What if he climbed the stairs and looked down on the mosaic floor instead of crawling over it, his whole perception shifted. He realised his business was suffering because he had lost touch with the big picture, with what his business was about, how it was seen, how he marketed it, how he communicated with the ‘whole’ network and much more. He saw what he needed to see to make the changes that encouraged staff to stay and the business to thrive.

We tell children fairy stories (metaphors) to help them understand life’s challenges.

We tell children fairy stories (metaphors) to help them understand life’s challenges.

We tell children fairy stories (metaphors) to help them understand life’s challenges. We tell parables and Zen stories to throw light on our lives. It’s sometimes easier and less confronting to help someone forward by sharing a metaphor than by discussing their situation more directly. We respond to the suggestions embedded in fairy stories, parables and other metaphors. Our unconscious minds particularly embrace this format – metaphors speak the language of the unconscious mind, the language of dreams.

If you’re the kind of person who tends to focus on small details and miss the big picture, it’s very likely that my little dream story about Mosaic Man has  already filtered through to your unconscious mind. It will be there for you when you need it. And, neatly encompassed in the same dream metaphor is the reverse suggestion – that sometimes you may need to get closer to the small details, to get in touch with things you may overlook in the big picture.

So here’s the thing:

Most dreams are one-sided metaphors, highlighting our often one-sided perception of life. The woman who dreamed she wasn’t getting served at the bar was viewing her unconscious mind’s summary that her needs were not being served. She looked at her dream and could relate it to her waking life, but what to do next? She knew she wasn’t getting her needs met, but didn’t know what to do about it. By asking What if questions of the dream scenario, you help yourself to see your options.

It never occurred to Thirsty Lady to serve herself. She had an unconscious belief in waiting, and waiting, and waiting. Changing the metaphor (asking What if questions and imagining the results) changed her attitude by changing her perception. (This is another form of dream alchemy practice – the practice of transforming your unconscious perceptions and beliefs by changing the dream outcome.)

Drowning Man had always relied on people to save him. He let life happen to him, rather than making life happen according to his choices. By asking What if questions and imagining the outcomes, he realised he had choices. He saw his passive (let it happen to me) approach, and decided to be more active, to ‘start swimming’ towards his goals, and make it happen.

Where, in your life, can you remove your heavy shoes when you feel you are drowning?

Where, in your life, can you remove your heavy shoes when you feel you are drowning?

I have given you some ready-made metaphors in this article, metaphors you can apply to various life situations. There might be somewhere in your life right now where you can remove your heavy shoes when you feel you are drowning, or choose a better destination when you are obviously intent on making yourself late for your ‘plane’, or re-evaluate the load you are carrying, or realise you’re only as imprisoned as you believe, or that what you imagined to be a fork in the road was a complete misunderstanding.

Next time you have a dream with an unsatisfactory ending, ask yourself MANY What if questions. Imagine the possible outcomes. Then look for the life situation that parallels your dream. Once you have matched your dream metaphor to a life situation, you can apply your What ifs to your life situation – and strike gold.

[Copyright Jane Teresa Anderson, February 2008. First published as a Dream Sight article.]

What if … starting today, you dream-weave a new vision of how you are in the world?

What if … starting today, you dream-weave a new vision of how you are in the world?

What if …

starting today, you dream-weave a new vision of how you are in the world?

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The right question

How can you escape being eaten by a hungry lion?

How can you escape being eaten by a hungry lion?

Are you looking to your dreams for answers to important questions? Do you go to bed hoping for a dream that will explain all and show you the best way forward? Are you looking for solutions to personal issues, guidance on career, or a bankable genius eureka to boost your fortune?

The dreaming mind offers all these possibilities, IF you’re looking at your dream from the right angle. And what is the right angle? It starts with the right question. The right question goes straight to the point and delivers the right answer, the best solution, the breakthrough.

Most dreams have a storyline, comprising four parts.

The first part of a dream is the opening. It’s the ‘Once upon a time …’ or ‘I was walking along …’. This is the part of the dream that sets the scene.

The second part of a dream is often a problem or question. It’s the ‘A hungry lion was chasing me …’ or ‘I couldn’t find my way …’ or ‘My car was missing ..’. Each of these can be seen as a problem or a question. For example, you might see the problem as the presence of a hungry lion, or you might see the question as, ‘How can I escape being eaten by the hungry lion?’

The third part of a dream is usually where your dreaming brain tries to work out a solution. In the lion example, you might try running faster, climbing higher, jumping into water or hiding. This part of a dream is usually the longest, as various approaches to solving the problem or finding an answer to the question are tried out.

How can I stop the hungry lion chasing me?

How can I stop the hungry lion chasing me?

Many dreams end here, without a part four, in a never-ending search for a solution. These are unresolved dreams. You wake up from these with a sense of the unfinished, perhaps feeling frustrated as if you’ve been working hard all night going round in circles getting nowhere, the hungry lion still hot on your tail.

The fourth part of a dream – for those dreams that find a solution – is the resolution, the ending. Your dream may have a happy ending (you are rescued from the lion) or an unhappy ending (your rescuer is eaten by the lion, even though you are saved).

Before reading further, think of a couple of dreams you have had recently, and see if you can break them down into these three or four parts. See if you can identify the problem or question in each dream. Write the problem or question down.

How do I know the lion is hungry?

How do I know the lion is hungry?

So far, so good. Thinking logically, all you need to do is identify the problem or question in part two of your dream and ask yourself how this relates to your waking life. For example, you might see the question, ‘How can I escape being eaten by the hungry lion?’ as being like ‘How can I escape the feeling that everyone wants more from me than I can give – that everyone wants a part of me?’ Once you’ve identified the waking life problem or question your dream is processing, you know that the rest of the dream is concerned with finding a solution to your problem, an answer to your question. Isn’t that wonderful!

Well, yes. It’s a wonderful beginning. Remember that dreams never tell you what to do. They tell you how things ARE. Your dreams are a result of your dreaming brain processing your experiences of the last 24-48 hours, so what you get from looking at a dream is an insight into how your brain processes your life. THIS is wonderful!

When you interpret a dream, you get to understand how you process your life experiences. You get to understand why your life is the way it is. If your lion dream features you running away, never finding an escape, then this is how you are processing your life – you are running away, never finding an escape from the feeling that everyone wants more from you than you can give. If your dream ends with your rescuer being killed, you get to understand that your brain sees a solution where you could ‘kill off’ your tendency to rescue people. Your dreaming brain has solved the problem of you wearing yourself out, eating yourself away with rescuing other people only to still feel pursued and drained. Whether or not you take this action when you wake up is your decision. Your dream does not tell you to do this, it simply indicates that your brain is looking at this as a possible solution and also reveals that this would bring up some unhappiness for you to deal with.

Most often your dreams travel old ground, trying the same old approaches because your brain (and your unconscious mind) is programmed this way by all your past experiences. The brain usually chooses the old way over the new. Occasionally, though, the brain will surprise you with a breakthrough – a new way of processing the same old stuff, a new creative solution, perhaps even that bankable eureka.

Your dream tells it like it is. It tells you about you and how you brain works today. You then make your decisions based on that message.

So, here’s the big thing

Why hasn’t the lion eaten before now?

Why hasn’t the lion eaten before now?

Knowing that every dream reflects how your brain is processing your life, you must question the question your dream poses! The question in part two of your dream is just as much a result of the way your dream processes your life as the rest of the dream. You ‘see’ a problem in your life and your dreaming brain brings up this ‘problem’, exactly as you see it, because that’s its job. Its job is to process your life experiences of the last 24-48 hours, and one of your life experiences in that last 24-48 hours was the ‘problem’ exactly as you experienced – and decided to see – it.

Can you see the power of questioning your dream question? When you question your dream question you question how you normally question your life. You question why you see certain things as problems. You question why you see a problem one way instead, perhaps, of from a more insightful angle.

Here’s what to do

Take the question you have identified in your dream, and see how many other questions you can get out of it. Like this:

How can I escape being eaten by the hungry lion?
How can I stop the hungry lion chasing me?
Why am I running away from the hungry lion?
How do I know the lion is hungry?
Is the lion hungry?
Why is the lion hungry?
What’s a lion’s favourite food?
Why is the lion chasing me and not someone else?
Why hasn’t the lion eaten before now?
Have I got some other food I can give the lion?
Can I tell the lion where to get better food?
Can the lion do something for me in exchange for better food?

I’m sure you can add more to this list!

Simply doing this for the question in part two of your dream may be enlightening enough. It reveals many ways to look at a situation, reminding you that some angles or perspectives look more problematic than others. It may help you to see that you’re not asking the best question. Reframing your situation and asking a different question results in a different answer.

Consider the question, ‘Is the lion hungry?’ Maybe you’ve misread a situation as threatening and you’re spending all your energy trying to escape it, and all the while the situation is not at all threatening. Maybe that lion is running after you because he needs to tell you something helpful. Like you’re running towards a very hungry tiger!

Consider the question, ‘Why is the lion chasing me and not someone else?’ Thinking about this you might realise that you tend to set yourself up as an easy target, too willing to let others have a piece of you maybe.

Consider the question, ‘Why hasn’t the lion eaten before now?’ Contemplating this, you might be baffled. Lion are supposed to be strong, they get what they want – so this lion must have lost its strength, lost its ability to be king of the jungle. You might realise that you have been forgetting to feed and nurture your inner strength. You may see that you have starved your inner strength, and that’s why you feel too weak to stand up to other people’s demands on your time and energy.

Use your dream interpretation skills to understand your dream symbols (lion, hungry …) and see how they relate to your life. Look at your dream to understand how you are currently seeing and processing your life.

Then, before looking for an answer to your waking life problem in your dream, look for the question. When you’ve found the question, reframe it many ways.

Think about those reframed questions, and answer them. Along the way, you’ll discover the key question – the right question – that shifts your perspective and unlocks the best answer.

[Copyright Jane Teresa Anderson, October 2008. First published as a Dream Sight article.]

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Episode 83 The Dream Show: Chased by a lion

Thank you for your help
‘There must be 50 ways to leave a lover,’ according to Paul Simon’s lyrics, but how many ways are there to escape a hungry lion hot on your tail?

In today’s show we look at how to find creative solutions to waking life problems by applying a simple, fun technique to any dream.

Paul Simon’s lyrics continue, ‘”The problem is all inside your head”, she said to me,’ and isn’t that so true? A problem is only a problem if that’s the way you see it. Then again, every problem or question has a solution – many solutions – once you shift your perspective and look at it from a different angle.

The technique I share with you in this episode shows you how to take any dream, identify the problem or question it poses about your waking life, and find several solutions for you to choose from.

I wish I’d thought of the Paul Simon angle while I was recording this episode, but it didn’t come to me until I started to type this introduction. Hmm, well, bear it in mind while you listen to the story of the lion. For good measure, I’ve added a story about why grass is green. Have a think before listening: why is grass green? Enjoy.

A new podcast every Friday. Listen here or subscribe on iTunes.

A new podcast every Friday. Listen here or subscribe on iTunes.

You can listen here (Episode 83)

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Gentle disguise: dreams of the departed

My grandfather died when I was thirteen. I didn’t really know him very well, and most memories I have of him are second hand, borrowed from stories told by others, a person and a life fabricated from tall tales, hearsay, and conjecture. He was well into his 60s when I, his first grandchild, was born. When he died, they found his heart pills tucked one-by-one under the mattress of his sick bed. He must have slipped them under his tongue then slipped them out again when no-one was looking.

I have three pictures of him.

My grandfather's wedding: a grand affair in Budapest, Hungary. My grandmother is sixteen.

My grandfather’s wedding: a grand affair in Budapest, Hungary. My grandmother is sixteen.

One is the last photo taken of him, relaxing in a garden chair. My grandmother kept that photo in a frame by her armchair, until she died many years later. I have that picture in my mind’s eye, in my photographic memory, you might say.

One is his wedding photo, a grand affair in Budapest, Hungary. He is in his late 20s or early 30s, an English sailor; my grandmother is about 16, a Budapest child. Read their faces.

One is the picture I have of him sitting on his motorbike, a couple of nights after he died, when he surprised me in a dream. And that’s the picture that stays with me, though I don’t remember him having a motorbike in waking life, and I don’t remember anything he ever said to me when he was alive. At the tender age of thirteen, that dream was life-changing. And at the tender age of thirteen, of course, I believed that Philip Augustus Newton had actually visited me from the afterlife in a dream.

I’ve had vivid, colourful, full-on textural dream recall for almost as long as I can remember being alive. I have always been fascinated by my dreams, but this was perhaps the first one that got my serious attention.

The dream was short. I was standing outside my school waiting for my young brother to walk up from primary school so we could walk home together. While I was waiting, a motorbike came up the road and stopped in front of me. After exchanging a few words, the driver lifted his dark visor, slowly revealing his face. I was surprised to see it was my grandfather.

“But you’re dead!” I reminded him.

“I didn’t want to frighten you, so I came in a dream,” he said.

That made sense, and I was thankful. I was surprised, my breath was momentarily taken away, but I was not frightened.

“I’m here to answer any questions. Is there anything you’d like to know before I go?” he asked.

“I only had one question,” I said. “Is there life after death? But I don’t need to ask that now.”

He smiled, lowered his visor, and rode away.

If this story sounds familiar to you, it’s because I’ve referred to this dream in another Dream Sight article, ‘Relativity’, which I wrote nine years ago, in October 2000. That article explores the question of communicating with the recently departed in dreams and looks at the symbolism of death dreams. Today, I am exploring a different theme.

“I didn’t want to frighten you, so I came in a dream,” he said, sitting astride a motorbike.

“I didn’t want to frighten you, so I came in a dream,” he said, sitting astride a motorbike.

What that dream did for me, as a teenager, was to assure me that dreaming was a safe space where I could face fears and find answers to questions as large as the meaning of life. I had no idea where to begin, and it would be many years before I would be able to interpret dreams, but I developed a profound respect for my dreams from that point forward.

Today, as a dream analyst and alchemist, my task, like my grandfather’s in my dream, is to help people safely face and understand the fears that limit and shape their lives, and to gently ask and answer questions that help them to clarify their vision and touch a deeper sense of meaning.

I’m often asked why dreams are so bizarre, so masked in symbolic language. I’m glad that they are. They allow us to gently prise them open, to give our eyes and hearts time to softly accustom to the light.

You may not know your deepest fears, but they show up, somewhat disguised, in your dreams.

“I didn’t want to frighten you,” a buried fear might say, “so I came in a dream. I’m here to answer any questions. Is there anything you’d like to know before I go?”

When you bury a fear, deep in your unconscious, it exerts a powerful influence on your life. It may be out of sight and out of your conscious mind, but that only gives it more power. Your unconscious fears limit and shape the way you respond in the world – and you have no idea that this is happening! You bury fears you do not want to face, yet the saving grace within gently reveals these to you in your dreams, asking, “Is there anything you’d like to know …?”

Knowledge is power. When you know about your fears – what they are, where they originated, why you have buried them, how they are influencing your life – you can set them, and yourself, free.

[Copyright Jane Teresa Anderson, November 2009. First published as a Dream Sight article.]

More on dreams about death, dying and the departed.

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Dream Alchemy – secret spells

I’m about to give you some magical formulae you can use to transform your life.

I’m about to give you some magical formulae you can use to transform your life.

I’m about to give you some magical formulae you can use to transform your life. They’re simple, yet powerful. They’re serious, and they work, but for a bit of fun I’ve arranged them as magic spells from an imaginary book of alchemical secrets. Before we delve in, though, let’s look at the theory so you understand why these work and how to apply them.

Imagine you dreamed of a huge dark cloud. The cloud was suspended above you, throwing its darkness and gloom all around. The air was oppressive, heavy, and still. What is the meaning of this dream?

You might have this dream if you were feeling oppressed by dark, gloomy, negative feelings. You might think about your dream and see that this is indeed true. You might then think about where these dark, gloomy, negative feelings are coming from. You might decide they’re coming from you and your negative thoughts about life. You might suddenly see that you have been going about your life dragging this negative outlook with you wherever you go. Other people in similar circumstances might see the sunny side or be uplifted by the silver lining in life’s challenges. Rather than being motivated to create something wonderful from the silver lining, your dream shows you bogged down in the heavy stillness of your negative outlook on life. Okay, so far so good. You have interpreted and understood your dream.

You may even go further and say the dark cloud is the gloom cast by a relationship break-up, job loss, or major disappointment. You may think about this and decide the gloom is your anger about the disappointment (like a thunderous cloud before an angry storm) or you might decide the heavy cloud is your unexpressed grief (like a cloud that hasn’t rained itself free of its tears).

Okay, so far even better. You have interpreted and understood your dream even more deeply. Is this enough then? Is this the power of dream interpretation?

Does it end here? Does going forward in your life understanding your gloomy, negative outlook help you to dispel it and substitute an uplifting, positive outlook in its place?

Maybe, maybe not. Sometimes awareness is powerful enough to enable you to make a change. For example, each time you feel the presence of the gloomy, black cloud pervading a situation you might think, “Enough! Where’s the silver lining? How can I look at my situation positively?” Some people can make the switch effectively. Many need a little extra magic to make the change.

It’s better to cry away the black cloud, to feel the grief and let it go, or to feel the anger and let it go, so that looking at the world positively becomes natural rather than forced.

It’s better to cry away the black cloud, to feel the grief and let it go, or to feel the anger and let it go, so that looking at the world positively becomes natural rather than forced.

Sometimes you cannot effectively make the change until you get in touch with associated emotions and work through them. For example, if you have not cried away your grief, then when you switch from negative to positive outlook you push your grief further down into your being and this will certainly give you discomfort at a later stage in your life. It’s better to cry away the black cloud, to feel the grief and let it go, or to feel the anger and let it go, so that looking at the world positively becomes natural rather than forced. If there’s no grief or anger in your way, then naturally things look good. If there’s still grief or anger hanging around, it’s hard work to keep remembering to switch on a positive outlook, and, besides, your grief or anger will keep returning in your dreams until you hear it, feel it, learn from it, and let it go.

So how can you do the magical bit to move from simply understanding your dream to transforming your life in a long-lasting (deeply healing) way? The solution is dream alchemy (those alchemical spells).

Dream alchemy is the magic of transforming symbols from your dream. In this example, you might visualise transforming the gloomy, black cloud by letting it rain itself away over a dry field, causing beautiful sunny flowers to bloom. Dream alchemy practices always sound far too simple, silly even, but they work because they involve symbols that your unconscious dreaming mind understands. When you do dream alchemy, you are talking the language of your unconscious mind and it is listening, responding, and transforming. These alchemical spells, correctly done, change the beliefs you carry that are affecting the way you see the world and the way you act in the world. When these things change – when you see the world differently and act in the world differently – your experience of life changes accordingly. In other words, your life changes for the better.

You can get quite creative with your dream alchemy practices. In the example, I added the flowers blooming to ensure that something wonderful blossomed from the release of grief.

You can get quite creative with your dream alchemy practices. In the example, I added the flowers blooming to ensure that something wonderful blossomed from the release of grief.

If you had the black cloud dream and you did the dream alchemy visualisation described above according to the correct method you may first feel the grief or the anger, but this will feel deeply cathartic and healing. You will naturally traverse through these feelings, and emerge feeling light and free. From there forward, you will move through the world in a different way.

You can get quite creative with your dream alchemy practices. In the example, I added the flowers blooming to ensure that something wonderful blossomed from the release of grief.

The key to designing the best dream alchemy practice is to understand your dream first. When you understand your dream you gain self-awareness, a precious gift, and when you understand your dream you are best-equipped to pick the right symbol to transform through dream alchemy.

As a general guide, be inspired by these secret formulae from my imaginary book ‘Alchemical secrets’.

Alchemical Secrets

Dream
dark cloud,
understood by dreamer as negative outlook due to grief

Alchemy
let the cloud rain its tears away over a desert, making flowers bloom

*

Dream
starving horse,
understood by dreamer as a passionate energy you are not feeding

Alchemy
feed the horse until you can feel its strength and passion in your body

*

Dream
old man close to death,
understood by dreamer as a belief you need to put to rest

Alchemy
embrace the man and thank him for all he has taught you

*

Dream
old man close to death,
understood by dreamer as old values you want to revive

Alchemy
give the man a job or role that restores his sense of value and vitality

*

Dream
going round in circles,
understood by dreamer as needing a new approach

Alchemy
half way round the circle take a straight route to an exciting place

*

Dream
unable to fly beyond power lines,
understood by dreamer as trapped by power games

Alchemy
fly around the power lines to the place you want to be

*

Dream
shaky ground,
understood by dreamer as losing your sense of confidence

Alchemy
make the ground firm and feel its solidity beneath your feet

*

Dream
shaky ground,
understood by dreamer as changes around you feeling exciting

Alchemy
shake that ground into where you would like to be

*

Get the picture? As you can see from the dreams of the old man close to death and the dreams of the shaky ground, the secret is to understand your dream before creating your dream alchemy practice and casting your alchemical spell. (Two people may each dream of shaky ground, but the different details in their dreams reveal the different meanings.)

Remember to check the detailed methods for doing your dream alchemy practices, and if you need a little help from me in understanding your dreams or creating dream alchemy practices you can consult me by Skype or phone.

[Copyright Jane Teresa Anderson, July 2007. First published as a Dream Sight article.]

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Dancing yin to yang

In dreams I am a most spectacular dancer, and from each dream dance a great lesson is learned.

In dreams I am a most spectacular dancer, and from each dream dance a great lesson is learned.

In night dreams I am the most spectacular dancer, always harmoniously partnered, cheek to cheek, heart to heart, soul to soul. Our weightless dances defy the gravity and clumsiness of waking life, as we move as one into every dimension of space until the dance ends and I wake up still smiling from the touch of the light fantastic. And from each dream dance, a great lesson is learned.

My earliest dance lessons came from my father as he waltzed me around the room, my little feet perched upon his big, dependable shoes.

My earliest dance lessons came from my father as he waltzed me around the room, my little feet perched upon his.

My earliest dance lessons came from my father as he waltzed me around the lounge room, my little feet perched upon his big, dependable shoes.

By the time I was seven I had decided my life’s mission was to be a ballet dancer. On being told I’d probably be too tall, I thought I could be a choreographer. Either way, no money for ballet lessons soon buried that plan. Prancing and pirouetting around the bedroom did nothing to enhance my future career prospects.

Besides, I was knock-kneed as my dancing needs clashed with economical reality. I took up yoga and learned the art of freestyle dance instead. I have since learned that dance lessons fade to insignificance alongside the lessons of dancing. Step with me into my dancing dreams to see why:

My dream partner was dancing me as he stood firmly and fully on my toes.

My dream partner was dancing me as he stood firmly and fully on my toes.

I once dream danced with someone I knew from waking life. It was a kind of reversal of my father’s waltz routine. In this dream dance the man placed his feet on mine and we waltzed the perfect waltz. The strangeness of the dream was that instead of me dancing his balancing feet through the steps, he was in control of the dance. He was the one calling the tune. He was dancing me as he stood firmly and fully on my toes. On waking I realised that this man had indeed, in waking life, called the steps. He had often trodden on my toes, but I had not recognised this and so the dance had been perfect for my learning at that time.

Life is always in harmony and balance, even when it seems not to be so. What we need to learn about ourselves is reflected in our world. I needed to learn about issues of control and being controlled, of restriction and freedom, through the delirious dance of the trodden toes. We danced to the pendulum of extremes until the calmness of the middle path stilled the motion and the dance came to its natural end.

Yet people in our dreams are not themselves, but aspects of our own selves. My treading-toes dance partner was the part of myself which danced the tune of conditioned restriction and lovingly taught the lesson of breaking free. He was my outer world, my Yang. I was his inner world, his Yin. We danced, cheek to cheek, Yin to Yang in search of the still calm point between us.

Think of the Yin Yang symbol, looking like two tadpoles nestled into each other, opposites huddled together in balance.

Think of the Yin Yang symbol, looking like two tadpoles nestled into each other, opposites huddled together in balance.

Think of the Yin Yang symbol, for all the world looking like two tadpoles nestled into each other, top to tail, each complete with an eye at the rounded head end. Or perhaps the symbol is more of a sacred 69. One side is black with a white ‘eye’ while the other is white with a black ‘eye’. One is Yin, one is Yang.

They are extremes, opposites huddled together in balance. As you trace the black of one tadpole from the thinness of its tail to the abundance of its head, you see the white of the eye colour. What this means is that as we approach an extreme in our attitude or being (the extreme being represented by the abundance of colour) a seed of the opposite nature appears. At the extreme swing of the pendulum, an excess of Yang births the return swing of the Yin. By the time the pendulum reaches its Yin extreme, the seed of a new Yang birth springs into being.

In swing style, Yin and Yang dance the great pendulum arcs that ultimately deliver the mutual destiny of the middle path.

My tango dream: was I being too flexible, too laid back? Or was I over-extending myself?

My tango dream: was I being too flexible, too laid back? Or was I over-extending myself?

In another dream of years past, I tangoed across the tiles, leaning back so far in my dream stranger partner’s arms that my body was suspended horizontal to the floor. I momentarily hovered only a few centimetres above the ground until I was lightly whisked and whirled back into the next staccato tango pose. The lesson from this dream dance was to find the balance between the extreme of being too flexible, too laid back and the extreme of expecting too much from myself through forcing over-extension.

One dream dance duo had me cart-wheeling, face to face, hands to hands, feet to feet with my tumbling dream partner. Childish joy, upside-down, right side up, round and round, dizzying we roller-coastered our cartwheel harmony until my partner finally let go and I finished in standing pose, one hand out-stretched, ready for my next dance partner to continue my journey. And so the great lesson of the cycles of life, the ups and downs, the rounds and rounds, the repetitions, the recurring dreams and the final achieving of the still point was energetically clothed as a dream dance. There I stood, in the quiet moment between one cycle of life and the next, between one lesson completed and another about to start, between one dance partner and the next.

Dance lessons fade to insignificance alongside the lessons of dancing.

Dance lessons fade to insignificance alongside the lessons of dancing.

May you soon find yourself dream dancing cheek to cheek, Yin to Yang, paradoxically stepping the duality of life’s one path strewn with the lessons of so many perfect dances.

[Copyright Jane Teresa Anderson, September 2000. First published as a Dream Sight article.]

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(Note: I wrote this article ten years ago, during a period of change, before I had found the name ‘dream alchemy’ to describe the approach I was evolving. Yet here it is, and there I am, doing the magic that created the firm foundation upon which the last ten years have been built.)

***

In the early hours of a still dark morning, back in 1983, my stomach churned as our bed lurched across the polished floor and the long bedroom curtains swished through the still air and swiped my face. The windows were closed. My husband slept soundly. My tiny children cradled on, familiar with sleeping in rocking arms, strapped onto my back or being carried in midnight sleep from late parties back to their beds without stirring. Perched in the penthouse of an apartment block high in the South American Andes, I realised why all our new friends lived in houses. This was my first experience of an earthquake and with a year ahead of us in Quito, Ecuador, it would not be my last. When we weren’t being shaken from side to side we were flipped from the ground by vertical quakes, leaving us stepping air for heart lurching moments.

I was reminded of this recently when I dreamed I was back in Quito, standing in a star-shaped dream house drawing a feeling of great strength from the ground beneath my feet: that very same ground that had rumbled and growled all those years ago. How things change!

In dreams the ground, or the earth, often represents the basis of our conscious understanding of the world. (It stands under us: it gives us our under-standing.)

In dreams the ground, or the earth, often represents the basis of our conscious understanding of the world. (It stands under us: it gives us our under-standing.)

In dreams the ground, or the earth, often represents the basis of our conscious understanding of the world. (It stands under us: it gives us our ‘understanding’.)  I have dreamed many earthquakes and earth tremors since my year in Ecuador, each dream shake-up symbolising change in my understanding of life. Out with the old basis and onto new territory.

Change begins in the depths of the unconscious, just as earthquakes begin in the deeper layers of the earth, moving unseen and dark way below the known surface. Subtle changes in our unconscious percolate through to affect the world we see and the way we see it. Our dreams often pick up on the deep inner upheavals, the re-arranging of our unconscious strata of thoughts, memories and conditionings, and present the deep movement as dream earthquakes, tremors, earth changes or earthworks. In this way, our earthquake dreams are like seismic detectors, giving us advance warning of coming change. They are personally precognitive rather than being premonitions of physical earth changes or world disasters.

So why did the ground beneath my feet in my recent dream of standing in the star-shaped house feel so solid? Why did I feel I was drawing on great strength?

Quito was not only a place of earthquake and tremor for me. It was a time of adaptation, of opening myself to new skills and new possibilities. In its quaky shakiness it created new foundation stones for my future, a future based on trusting intuition and embracing change as a positive force directing the unfolding of life. My recent dream mirrored back to me the difference between my initial fear of change in those early Quito days and the strength I can draw from the ground I have built beneath my feet since then.

One of the advantages of a dream rich in sensation is that you can invoke the memory of the dream feeling when needed. I have summoned up that intense sensation of drawing strength from the ground on several occasions since the dream, and felt it positively influence the situations and their outcomes. You can use positive emotions from dreams in this way by picturing yourself in the dream scene and letting the same feeling fill you to overflowing as you negotiate life situations relevant to the dream.

Pay attention to the various grounds you walk upon in your dreams to learn what they reflect about your present understanding of life. Traversing rocky ground may suggest that life seems ‘rocky’ to you. Or, on the contrary, walking on rock in a dream may reflect solidity or a firm belief in old ways since rocks themselves are ancient formations. Slippery ground may reveal feelings of insecurity about life (what will happen if you ‘slip up’?). Muddy earth may reflect a muddied, unclear basis to your understanding. Gravel may symbolise a connection with the temporary as gravel paths are often later made more solid.

Your dream ground may be a high rung on a tottering ladder with a small centre of gravity. What might this reflect about your under-standing?

Your dream ground may be a high rung on a tottering ladder with a small centre of gravity. What might this reflect about your under-standing?

Or gravelly ground may suggest an irritating basis to life since gravel gets under your skin when you fall, or can make it difficult for you to ‘get a firm grip’ under certain conditions. Your dream ground may be a high rung on a tottering ladder with a small centre of gravity, indicating perhaps instability or lack of a firm basis.

If you find yourself walking on water … well … water symbolises our emotions as well as our unconscious and don’t we just need the reminder from time to time that we can all perform miracles if we’re in touch with our unconscious?

I haven’t walked on water, but I have walked on air in my waking life – well, almost. After the year of living at altitude in the Andes my body changed in the way that all bodies do to adapt to the lesser amounts of oxygen in the high atmosphere. The haemoglobin levels in my blood increased and so did my lung capacity. Together these physical adaptations to the thin air worked to deliver more oxygen to my body than in my pre-Quito days. Gone were the tingling lips, numb finger tips and dizziness of my first six weeks living up near the snow-capped volcanoes on the equator. When we left Ecuador en route to Australia, we touched down in San Francisco for a week. ‘Touched’ was the right word. Pumped up on oxygen I felt as if I was air-walking, bouncing back from each step and bounding forward without effort. Like walking on the Moon. And when I laughed at the lack of ground beneath my feet, I hyperventilated and spun out on oxygen overload. I was high from living on high and was finding the old familiar world disorientating and unreal in its new strangeness.

Our dreams help us to resolve our unconscious conflicts as they shuffle the unconscious layers of thoughts, memories and conditioning to create changed perceptions of once familiar worlds. The strengths we can draw from our many awakenings are well worth the occasional queasy quakes that create the firmer ground of new under-standing.

[Copyright Jane Teresa Anderson, July 2000. First published as a Dream Sight article.]

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Hole in the road

His father's voice would always sing out from the back of his mind, 'There was I, a-digging this 'ole'.

His father’s voice would always sing out from the back of his mind, ‘There was I, a-digging this ‘ole’.

Out driving recently, we slowed down to pass road works. Orange witches’ hats marked off a hole in the centre of the road. Intrepid road workers were jack-hammering their way, waist deep in rubble, ear deep in mind numbing noise.

“You know,” Michael began, “whenever we passed road works when we were children, Dad would always sing, ‘There was I, a-digging this ‘ole, ‘ole in the ground sort of big and sort of round …’. And I would vow never to be as predictable and repetitive when I grew up.”

“And you’ve succeeded,” I replied, “I’ve never heard you burst into song and we’ve passed plenty of road works in our life together.”

“Yes and no,” Michael cringed. “I may not sing  but I’ve never passed a road works without hearing my father’s voice striking up from the back of my mind, ‘There was I, a-digging this ‘ole’. He just won’t go away!”

We can drive on past the hole in the road without bursting into song ... but what about the holes we can't see?

We can drive on past the hole in the road without bursting into song … but what about the holes we can’t see?

We can laugh about these perpetual voices that echo on from our past. Parents, teachers, priests and school bullies, for example, often leave their mark. All the while we are aware of them we can shrug our shoulders and smile. We can drive on past the hole in the road without bursting into song, talk to our children without old-fashioned admonishment, and be assertive without fear of the school bully hurting us.

But what about the echoes we are not aware of? Deep in your unconscious mind are the records of every conversation, event and experience you have lived through carefully filed alongside the feelings these evoked in you. These experiences and feelings have shaped your life, even though you do not remember them. They form a blueprint, a pattern that exerts an influence on how you respond to the world. They may be unconscious patterns, but that fact alone makes them far more powerful than the patterns you are consciously aware of. The hole in the road you know about is not a problem. You won’t fall into it. But the very real hole in the road you are NOT conscious of is a danger.

How does this relate to dreams?

Dreams are reflections of both your unconscious and conscious minds, with special highlights on the conflicts between the two. When you know how to cut through the language of your dreams and interpret them, you can understand the blueprint patterns that are still operating in your life. Your dreams bring to light what is usually hidden to your waking eyes. Your dreams reveal the holes in the road, how they got there, and how they are affecting your waking life today. What powerful information!

"Money doesn't grow on trees", she said, speaking without thinking her own mother's echoing words which were also her grandmother's.

“Money doesn’t grow on trees”, she said, speaking without thinking her own mother’s echoing words which were also her grandmother’s.

For example, you may have forgotten the day when the other kids in your street were given money to buy ice creams from the ice cream van, but your mother didn’t have the change. She told you, “Money doesn’t grow on trees”, speaking without thinking her own mother’s echoing words which were also her grandmother’s. She didn’t realise you were the only kid in the street to miss out, and she certainly didn’t know the others taunted you about it for weeks.

As a five year old you felt deeply hurt, by the other kids and by your mother. You mistakenly learned that money was available to other people but not to you. When a deep feeling is associated with a belief (remember that children’s feelings are big) the belief is all the more strongly anchored. The child, in this example, grew up and forgot the incident, but his unconscious mind remembered and dug a huge hole in the road. As an adult, he wondered why he encountered difficulties with self-esteem and self-value. He didn’t know that his unconscious mind had established a belief pattern that he was less worthy of reward than others.

The problem is that the unconscious mind is far more powerful than the conscious mind, so its blueprint wins over conscious mind ideals, thoughts and goals.

Those plans you have that seem to keep misfiring are most likely overpowered by your unconscious beliefs in holes in the road and other perceived pitfalls and dangers. Your unconscious mind will sabotage realisation of your plans to ‘save’ you from such fates.

The solution? Change the blueprint.

This is easily done once you can interpret your dreams. There are various techniques (dream alchemy practices) that use the symbols of your unique dreams to change your unconscious blueprint.

Let your dreams enable you to build a smooth road forward, splendidly lit by diamonds gathered from the deepest pitfalls that once lined your route.

Let your dreams enable you to build a smooth road forward, splendidly lit by diamonds gathered from the deepest pitfalls that once lined your route.

Think of the process as mending the holes in the road so that you can make smoother and faster progress. You can’t remove a hole. The way to mend it is to fill it in. You can’t simply remove an unconscious belief; you need to fill the hole it occupied with a new, more appropriate belief. Dream alchemy practices are designed to do this.

But first, dream alchemy encourages you to look deep into the hole your dreams have revealed, for the best gems and treasures are discovered by mining deep into the earth, deep into the self.

Let your dreams enable you to build a smooth road forward, splendidly lit by diamonds gathered from the deepest pitfalls that once lined your route.

[Copyright Jane Teresa Anderson, March 2003. First published as a Dream Sight article.]

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Dream vibrations and the LOA

I am often asked about the Law of Attraction, and whether nightmares and dreams with negative vibes attract negative people and events into our lives. It’s a good question. So, let’s explore:

Books about the Law of Attraction have enjoyed waves of popularity since the early 1900s

Books about the Law of Attraction have enjoyed waves of popularity since the early 1900s

Books about the Law of Attraction have enjoyed waves of popularity since the early 1900s, with a recent resurgence in the early 1990s and a deluge of interest since 2000. Rhonda Byrne’s ‘The Secret’ DVD and book, published in 2006, repackaged the Law of Attraction in a way that inspired millions of people to start making the LOA – as it is now commonly known – help them achieve their goals. So, what is the LOA, exactly?

According to the LOA, you receive according to the vibe you give out. Like vibes attract like vibes. If your focus on money is all positive you attract plenty of it into your life, whereas if your focus on money is negative (for example, if you focus on debt or lack of money), then you attract debt or lack into your life. According to the law, whatever you focus on, you get more of the same.

The LOA is working all the time, whether you believe in it or not. I know this to be true. The secret everyone is searching for is how to become an active participant in the process – how to create and maintain the vibe that brings you what you want.

Imagine you know that secret, and you put all your waking hours into maintaining the vibe that will bring you what you want, and then you go to sleep and have a dream ...

Imagine you know that secret, and you put all your waking hours into maintaining the vibe that will bring you what you want, and then you go to sleep and have a dream …

Imagine you know that secret, and you put all your waking hours into maintaining the vibe that will bring you what you want, and then you go to sleep and have a dream brimming with negative emotions, perhaps grief, anger or loss of confidence. Does the negative vibe of your dream beam out into the universe and undo all that daytime work?

Here’s where the magic of working with your dreams comes in. If you really want the LOA to work for you, then pay attention to your dreams. First up, there are a few basics you need to know:

1. Remember that dreams are symbolic, not literal. So if you dream that someone you know dies, your dream is NOT predicting that person’s death. The dream is symbolic and it is about something that is ending (dying off) in your life. Dreams of death are very common, and many people are frightened to mention them because they fear that putting the dream into words, or paying it attention, will cause it to happen. Please be assured that this is not the way it works. In fact, not talking about a worrying dream increases your waking life anxiety – and this affects your vibe. It’s better to talk about a worrying dream, interpret it, understand more about yourself as a result, and move on, free of any negative vibe. In this example, once you understand what is coming to an end in your life, you can decide to bring it back to life or to let it go and move on to something better. Interpretation brings you self understanding and choice.

2. The emotions you feel in your dreams are emotions that belong to you. Sometimes they’re emotions you’re aware of; most often they’re unconscious emotions that you’ve buried long ago, or emotions you’ve repressed because you can’t acknowledge them in your waking life.

3. In the same way, the beliefs, limitations and blocks you encounter in your dreams are your own unconscious beliefs, limitations and blocks.

4. So, when you interpret a dream, you discover your unconscious emotions, beliefs, limitations and blocks.

Whether you’re awake or asleep, your unconscious mind continuously sends out its vibe.

Whether you’re awake or asleep, your unconscious mind continuously sends out its vibe.

Now here’s the most important thing to understand. Whether you’re awake or asleep, your unconscious mind continuously sends out its vibe. And your unconscious mind is far more powerful than your conscious mind.

For example, you might choose to focus on sending out a positive vibe about money all day. You spend all day doing this, feeling totally positive and good about it. As far as you are aware, you have absolutely no block to having vast amounts of money in your life. However, your unconscious mind may have a different agenda. You may have unconscious doubts, limiting beliefs and blocks about having so much money. Because your unconscious mind is stronger than your conscious mind, it wins in the battle of the vibes. You don’t see the results you wanted and you declare the LOA to be a crock. But it isn’t! The LOA is working for you perfectly. Your overall vibe, dictated by your unconscious mind, is attracting according to the law. You are receiving according to the vibe you are giving out.

The real secret to getting the Law of Attraction to bring you what you consciously want is to get your unconscious mind on side.

If you want the LOA to work for you, pay attention to your dreams.

If you want the LOA to work for you, pay attention to your dreams.

So rather than ask if a worrying dream is sending out a negative vibe, attracting negative things to you, celebrate the fact that being able to remember your dream is the first step to identifying a negative vibe that your unconscious mind is sending out while you are awake, a negative vibe of which you are oblivious, a negative vibe that is attracting negative stuff to you.

You dream every night, and a dream has a vibe whether or not your remember it. Learning to remember your dreams and interpret them is an empowering step to take if you’re serious about attracting what you want into your life.

Dream interpretation identifies your unconscious beliefs, so you can easily pick the ones that are working against your conscious wishes. The next question is, how do you change those unconscious beliefs to align them to your conscious wishes?

This is done through the process of dream alchemy. These are simple exercises such as visualisations and affirmations that reprogram your unconscious beliefs. Here’s an example:

You dream you are driving a car but you can’t see ahead clearly because the windscreen is dark. This is a common dream indicating that you are unclear about your vision for your future. This lack of clarity is the work of an unconscious block sabotaging your vision. To apply dream alchemy when you wake up, visualise yourself back in the dream only this time the windscreen is exceptionally clear and you can see your way. Visualise yourself driving well, and add in all the positive emotions you associate with achieving your goal. Doing the dream alchemy practice – the visualisation – undoes the block and reprograms the associated unconscious belief in alignment with your conscious intention. (Do a dream alchemy visualisation 20 times a day for a week, ten times a day for the second week and twice a day for the next month.)

So tune into your dreams to tune those unconscious negative vibes that you are beaming out 24/7 into positive vibes that ensure that the Law of Attraction fulfils your conscious desires.

[Copyright Jane Teresa Anderson, April 2009. First published in longer version as a Dream Sight article.]

[You can listen to this article in episode 33 The Dream Show.]

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