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Chicken Licken

Chicken Licken

Chicken Licken was one of my favourite stories when I was three or four years old. I’m sure you know it. An acorn fell on Chicken Licken’s head as he was scouring the earth looking for food one day. Horrified he set off to tell the Queen the sky was falling. On the way he met Henny Penny, then Turkey Lurkey and so on.

Like any child with a favourite story, I wanted to hear it over and over again. Perhaps it was the rhythm and alliteration I liked, or perhaps I was fascinated by the idea of illusion. Like Chicken Licken we often misunderstand our experiences and, before long, those misunderstandings settle into concrete beliefs. Instead of witnessing the beautiful potential of the oak tree in the acorn, Chicken Licken lived in fear of the end of the world.

Chicken Licken came to mind following a dream I had earlier this month (I wrote this article 10 years ago, in June 2003, four months after my book, Dream Alchemy, was first published in Australia).

In my dream I was in a huge field with hundreds of other people, enjoying a mild, sunny day. Suddenly a plane appeared overhead.

“Will it drop bombs?” asked all the people, looking at me.

I looked up at the plane. It was very unusual. It looked more like a technical drawing, or blueprint plan than a plane. It was the plan for a future type of plane, yet somehow we were seeing it already.

“No,” I reassured them.

At that moment the plane dropped thousands of chocolates all over the field! Everyone ran around, gathering up handfuls of chocolates. I ate a soft-centred one (and really tasted it in my dream) then two more. That was enough for me but I watched as everyone else ate their fill.

As we all left the field I turned to look back and saw hundreds of identical, gold-wrapped chocolates dotted all over the grass.

“They’re the chocolate cracknels, the hard chocolates no-one ever eats, the ones that always get left in the box,” I explained to the person beside me. “Yet they’re manna from Heaven.”

“They’re the chocolate cracknels, the hard chocolates no-one ever eats, the ones that always get left in the box,” I explained to the person beside me. “Yet they’re manna from Heaven.”

“They’re the chocolate cracknels, the hard chocolates no-one ever eats, the ones that always get left in the box,” I explained to the person beside me. “Yet they’re manna from Heaven.”

I woke up before Forest Gump had time to pronounce that life is like a box of chocolates, but I wouldn’t have been surprised to see him there. What was his simple view? That some people get a soft-centred life and some get it tough?

So what did my dream mean?

The bottom line was that the tough stuff, the stuff we easily reject (the cracknels), is manna from Heaven because it’s the tough experiences that can deliver the sweetest lessons. In common with many authors and creative people I have, in the past, felt the fear of having my very public work rejected. Imagine – when you work hard at producing a beautiful baby you want everyone to love it! The reality is that some will and some won’t.

Through this dream I saw my future plan(e) of thought delivering a blessing of manna rather than destructive bombs. I realised my past approach may have been to sabotage my efforts to save my work from being judged and rejected. I am now blessing my field of dreams with chocolates, not decimating it with bombs.

I can see the golden opportunity in accepting that my work is cracknel or soft-centred depending on different people’s points of view, as this frees me to create without fear of judgement.

I can see the golden opportunity in accepting that my work is cracknel or soft-centred depending on different people’s points of view, as this frees me to create without fear of judgement.

I can see the golden opportunity in accepting that my work is cracknel or soft-centred depending on different people’s points of view, as this frees me to create without fear of judgement.

A friend, Angela, looked up the passage on manna from Heaven in the Book of Exodus: “it was like white coriander seed, and the taste of it was like wafers made with honey.” How close to the recipe for chocolate cracknel is that! And, yes, we were exiting the field and the topic of the dream was rejection (leaving, exodus).

The morning after my dream I met a new client who had been suffering from nightmares. I asked her if she could remember one feelgood dream. “Yes,” she replied, “it was about eating chocolate”.

Her name was Penny (real name). I heard a song strike up in the back of my mind. Gone was the chocolate manna from Heaven. Now I had “Pennies from Heaven” … Penny’s from Heaven.

Which all brings me back to Chicken Licken, Henny Penny and acorns from Heaven. Seeds for thought.

[First published as a Dream Sight article, June 2003. Copyright Jane Teresa Anderson 2003.]

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Is this your life?

One simple sentence

How often has your alarm clock saved you from a worrying dream you thought was real? What a relief to wake into your everyday life, where all the quandaries and confusions of the dream evaporate and leave you free to get on with your day! You may have spent all night trying to catch that dream plane but now, awake, your confidence in getting places on time is restored. Phew. Missing a plane would never happen to you, would it? You may have endured hair-raising confrontations with a slippery, fang-endowed snake but now, awake, you know that’s one encounter you need not worry about, living in the city, as you do. Or perhaps that alarm clock intruded on a passionate, illicit love affair. Plummeting to earth on opening your eyes you console yourself that at least your waking life is guilt-free. “No,” you conclude, looking around your bedroom, “This is my life. This is what’s real. There are no missed planes, lurking snakes or secret lovers in my life.”

“No,” you conclude, looking around your bedroom, “This is my life. This is what’s real. There are no missed planes, lurking snakes or secret lovers in my life.”

“No,” you conclude, looking around your bedroom, “This is my life. This is what’s real. There are no missed planes, lurking snakes or secret lovers in my life.”

But I invite you to take another look. No time? No problem! This is an easy exercise. It will take you no longer than five minutes a day and you can always set that alarm for five minutes earlier, can’t you?

This is what to do:

Write one sentence a day. It’s best to write this sentence a few minutes after waking up, while your dream is fresh on your mind, so keep an exercise book or diary by your bedside for this purpose.

The sentence is a summary of your dream, written in the present tense, starting with the words ‘I feel’ and including the word ‘something’. It can only be one sentence though! Here are some examples.

Your dream:

I feel worried that something precious and fragile may break.

I feel worried that something precious and fragile may break.

It was a long and complicated dream, but the part that stood out for you was when your son was carrying a stack of precious, fine china crockery. You were moving house and were worried that the plates, cups and saucers should have been properly packed to prevent them from breaking.

Your sentence might be:

I feel worried that something precious and fragile may break.

 

Your dream:

I feel frustrated that so many delays are slowing me down from achieving something so simple.

I feel frustrated that so many delays are slowing me down from achieving something so simple.

It’s your recurring dream theme again. It’s long, it’s involved, and the essence is that you have a plane to catch but everything goes wrong and you never get airborne.

Your sentence might be:

I feel frustrated that so many delays are slowing me down from achieving something so simple.

 

 

Your dream:

I feel surprised that something I expected to be painful was not as bad as I had anticipated, but only time will tell the full outcome.

I feel surprised that something I expected to be painful was not as bad as I had anticipated, but only time will tell the full outcome.

This dream was an epic adventure involving snakes appearing from nowhere, chasing you and threatening to bite you. At one point you were actually bitten. Surprisingly it didn’t hurt as much as you thought it would, but your dream ends in trepidation. Was the snake poisonous or harmless? Only time will tell.

Your sentence might be:

I feel surprised that something I expected to be painful was not as bad as I had anticipated, but only time will tell the full outcome.

 

Your dream:

I feel an attraction to something deeply and personally fulfilling, but I feel the only way I can protect my current way of life is to keep this secret.

I feel an attraction to something deeply and personally fulfilling, but I feel the only way I can protect my current way of life is to keep this secret.

You were magnetically attracted to an awesome person and ended up having a deeply loving sexual tryst that left you feeling elated physically, mentally and spiritually. In the dream you know you have been unfaithful to your partner. You decide the solution is to keep this affair secret.

Your sentence might be:

I feel an attraction to something deeply and personally fulfilling, but I feel the only way I can protect my current way of life is to keep this secret.

 

Your dream:

I feel surprise that when I dive into something I think will be painful, I discover such rich rewards.

I feel surprise that when I dive into something I think will be painful, I discover such rich rewards.

The bit that stands out for you in your dream is the swarm of bees. You get stung, yet you decide to chase the bees. They lead you to the hive where you dive in, as small as a bee now, and see all the honey being made. Rows and rows of tasty, golden honey glisten.

Your sentence might be:

I feel surprise that when I dive into something I think will be painful, I discover such rich rewards.

 

In each of these examples, notice that ‘something’ is usually one of the main dream symbols: it’s the crockery, catching the plane, the snakebite, the lover and the beehive. In other words, ‘something’ can be a thing, an action or goal, a sensation, a person or a place.

Use the examples as guidelines and remember to start with “I feel” and to include the word ‘something’.

Use the examples as guidelines and remember to start with “I feel” and to include the word ‘something’.

Five minutes a day to write one sentence summarising your dream. There is no right sentence. There are many ways to summarise a dream, so dive in and just do it.

Use the examples as guidelines and remember to start with “I feel” and to include the word ‘something’. As the days go by, you’ll get quicker at this.

Five minutes will become two. Just two minutes a day!

So what do you do with all these sentences after writing them down?

Choose a day, perhaps a weekend day or an evening you usually have to yourself, to take 30 minutes to review your list. Make it a weekly appointment with yourself. Allow no interruptions.

You will have seven sentences to review, assuming you remembered a dream on each night, less if your dream recall was not so hot. (If you remember more than one dream on any night, you can choose to summarise only the most vivid one, or to summarise them all.)

My relationship is precious to me but it feels fragile and in need of careful handling.

My relationship is precious to me but it feels fragile and in need of careful handling.

During your 30-minute weekly review, read each of your seven sentences in turn and ask yourself, “Where does this apply in my life?” If an answer comes to you, write it down, using – you’ve guessed it – one sentence.

As a guide, your answers to the examples in this article might be:

1. I feel worried that something precious and fragile may break. Where does this apply in my life?

Answer: My relationship is precious to me but it feels fragile and in need of careful handling.

2. I feel frustrated that so many delays are slowing me down from achieving something so simple. Where does this apply in my life?

Answer: Losing ten kilos in six months should be so simple, but here I am, still way overweight after twelve months of setting my goal.

3. I feel surprised that something I expected to be painful was not as bad as I had anticipated, but only time will tell the full outcome. Where does this apply in my life?

Answer: I finally got enough courage up to talk to my partner about a sensitive issue, and it wasn’t as painful I had expected it to be, though how things will turn out in the long run, I don’t know.

I want to build an energy-saving home and embrace a self-sufficient lifestyle, but to do this I risk losing the support of my family who enjoy the luxuries of life my current high income allows.

I want to build an energy-saving home and embrace a self-sufficient lifestyle, but to do this I risk losing the support of my family who enjoy the luxuries of life my current high income allows.

4. I feel an attraction to something deeply and personally fulfilling, but I feel the only way I can protect my current way of life is to keep this secret.

Where does this apply in my life?

Answer: I want to build an energy-saving home and embrace a self-sufficient lifestyle, but to do this I risk losing the support of my family who enjoy the luxuries of life my current high income allows.

5. I feel surprise that when I dive into something I think will be painful, I discover such rich rewards. Where does this apply in my life?

Answer: I finally decided to tackle my tax problem by enlisting the help of an accountant who not only taught me some simple, helpful bookkeeping skills but also got me an unexpected tax rebate!

What is the value in doing this exercise? These examples might give you the feeling that dreams simply tell us what we already know, but not so. It’s easy to think that, looking in on someone else’s dreams, someone else’s summary sentences, someone else’s answers. But we rarely appreciate the deeper patterns of our lives until we look closely. Your dreams draw your attention to the way your life is. They exclaim, “Hey! THIS is your life! Is this how you want it to be, or would you like to change this pattern?”

So, what might our example dreamer conclude?

She began to see why she tiptoes around her partner’s moods, fearful of breaking up

She began to see why she tiptoes around her partner’s moods, fearful of breaking up

1. Her dream about handling fragile crockery helped her to see that she regards her relationship as both precious and fragile. Strange though it may seem, she hadn’t seen her relationship in this light before, but her dream view suddenly made sense of a few things. She began to see why she tiptoes around her partner’s moods, fearful of breaking up, instead of finding a mutually beneficial way of relating, perhaps taking a tip from the dream and looking at better ways of strengthening the relationship (better ways of packing the crockery). Her dream gives her a metaphor to contemplate. Does she want a fragile relationship?

The delays, she saw, were all her own work.

The delays, she saw, were all her own work.

2. Her dream about missing the plane because of so many delays helped her to see that her weight-loss goal is achievable. Why? She travels widely with her job and never, ever misses a plane. If she can achieve something as simple as catching a plane by taking a step-by-step approach, she can achieve the equally simple goal of weight-loss. She looked at her dream again and suddenly saw all the delays in a new light: her lost baggage was her fear of losing weight, her lack of passport gave her a feeling that maybe, just maybe, she wasn’t ready to give herself permission to achieve her goal and all the rewards that go with it. The delays, she saw, were all her own work!

3. Her dream about the snakebite helped her to see that other sensitive issues that she fears broaching may also be less painful once faced. Her dream gave her courage, not only to face pain, but also to trust the outcome. She decided to visualise this dream whenever she needs to address an issue, summoning up a feeling of trust in the process.

4. Her dream about the secret affair helped her to realise just how important her desire to embrace a change of lifestyle was. It also helped her to see that her ‘secret affair’ was a form of infidelity to her family. In trying to protect them, she was hiding a wonderful part of her being from them. She wasn’t being true to them. From here she began to understand why some of her family relationships weren’t as fulfilling as they could be. She saw she needed to share more of herself. She called a family conference – an entirely new approach – and shared her dream of building an alternative lifestyle. She was blown away to discover that they also had ‘secret dreams’ and that they all had more in common than they had believed.

Whenever a task looked too daunting, too stinging, too deep, she closed her eyes and imagined flying into the hive and discovering all that honey.

Whenever a task looked too daunting, too stinging, too deep, she closed her eyes and imagined flying into the hive and discovering all that honey.

5. Her dream about the beehive, you might argue, was an afterthought. She had already dived into her tax problem and been rewarded with some very golden honey, so how could this dream be of help? Dreams confirm our excellent moves, cementing in positive new attitudes and patterns. She used the dream as a visualisation from that day forward. Whenever a task looked too daunting, too stinging, too deep, she closed her eyes and imagined flying into the hive and discovering all that honey. Her visualisation helped her to dive in, uplifting and inspiring her forward.

Five minutes a day, one simple sentence a day, one thirty minute contemplation once a week. Give it a go. What’s that? Can’t stop, you’ve got a plane to catch? I don’t think so. Is this your life?

[Copyright Jane Teresa Anderson, March 2006. First published as a Dream Sight article.]

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Episode 114 The Dream Show: Venus Fly Trap

A virtual coffee

The Dream Show, a free weekly podcast with Jane Teresa AndersonMy guest on the show today is Liza, asking about her spider dream. A spider named Venus Fly Trap! As always, dreams are not what they seem, and we unearth a very deep belief connecting way back, that has been influencing the way Liza’s relationships develop and unravel.

Of course we don’t leave it there. We move from awareness and insight to transformation, using dream alchemy techniques to transform Liza’s destructive belief into a constructive one that will result in more rewarding and sustaining relationships for her.

And you get to listen in to the whole process.

Her dream involves a plane, a mysterious reference to 1931, an old school friend she hasn’t seen since they were both eleven, and an x-rated jogging scene.

Her dream involves a plane, a mysterious reference to 1931, an old school friend she hasn’t seen since they were both eleven, and an x-rated jogging scene.

I choose not to hear my guests’ dreams before we start recording, and, since we do not edit our recordings, you get to experience exactly how it works, from my first hearing of the dream, to the interpretation, to the guests’ immediate responses as they relate the interpretation to what’s going on in their lives.

I believe this helps you, the listener, to understand the process and to absorb techniques and tips you can apply to your own dreams. Feedback tells me that this makes for exciting listening too, especially when the guests’ open up with their stories.

Liza’s spider named Venus Fly Trap enters her dream at the very end. Her dream involves a plane, a mysterious reference to 1931, an old school friend she hasn’t seen since they were both eleven, and an x-rated jogging scene. How do we put all this together?

It’s a fun episode and I know you’ll enjoy insights you can apply to your own dreams and life too.

Listen here (Episode 114)

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Episode 111 The Dream Show: Ethereal girl

A virtual coffee

Sophia is my guest today having her dream interpreted while you listen in to witness the process, pick up interpretation tips, and share the insights.

Sophia went to bed the night before our recording, asking for a special dream to bring to the show. She had seven dreams, and since all dreams on one night are usually connected in theme, we looked at three of these and quickly browsed the others. We struck plenty of gold.

There’s the ethereal winged girl with eyes like white bird’s eggs that flies down to chat with Sophia, there’s a warehouse packed with plane parts, there’s an unconscious, dehydrated dog, a policeman with a special gift, a sea voyage that is successful against the odds, and a trip to see the Queen.

A new podcast every Friday. Listen here or subscribe on iTunes.

A new podcast every Friday. Listen here or subscribe on iTunes.

How are these all linked, how do they relate to Sophia’s life, and what insight can she take from this night’s worth of dreams to make a big difference in her life? Listen in to find out!

Listen here (Episode 111).

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The leashes that bind

Brig dreamed of taking her dog for a walk, only on the end of the leash was a ...

Dreams, even when they’re scary, can be very playful. Some are laugh out loud funny, like Brig’s dream of taking her dog for a walk only instead of her dog what was on the end of the leash was a bit of lamb’s fry (offal). Deep and meaningful though the dream was, you’ve just got to laugh, and Brig’s co-presenter and anchor on Radio Mix 101.1FM Melbourne certainly made meat of that one on their breakfast show last week. It was an offal dream for Brig, but perfect breakfast fodder for the team, and we managed to get to the bottom of it pretty quickly.

Yvonne phoned the station with a dream of being a passenger in a plane, enjoying her trip until she looked out the window and noticed the plane had no wings. What was keeping it airborne? She looked towards the cockpit – chickens were harnessed to the plane keeping it aloft. That was fine by Yvonne until she remembered, in the dream, that chickens have clipped wings. She painted a playful picture, and look at those plays on words – cockpit and chickens. We’re ‘chicken’ when we’re scared, and Yvonne was pretty scared at the thought of being at the mercy of a band of wingless chickens. A wingless plane, wingless chickens, and yet the plane was safely flying along and getting somewhere.

Yvonne was pretty scared at the thought of being at the mercy of a band of wingless chickens.

Yvonne was pretty scared at the thought of being at the mercy of a band of wingless chickens.

Yvonne’s dream suggests she can achieve far more than she thinks and fears. She may fear that her plans and ideas don’t have wings, but they do. There’s so much more to Yvonne’s dream than breakfast radio allows time to say, but simply looking for word play is fun and gives a clue to the interpretation.

Rachel’s dream of dating a dentist who gave her a gift of a dental cup containing dental floss and mouthwash made us all smile, and she related to my brief interpretation about taking a new attitude to how she communicates – clean, clear, fresh, positive words and intent. “Yes,” she said, “that makes sense.” How playful of her dream to go for a dental hygiene theme to encapsulate this.

Andrea’s recurring dream was more frightening. She dreams of being smothered by hair while in bed, and sees a chest at the bottom of the bed with a light that pulls her down. She wakes up struggling for breath.

My quick on air interpretation was that Andrea’s dream comes up when she feels restricted during the day, as if she can’t breathe to claim her space to express herself, and that this ‘pulls her down’, depresses her. It was spot on, she could relate to it. There’s so much more to her dream, but notice again how helpful it is to look for word play. The chest at the bottom of the bed is also Andrea’s chest, the place where her lungs are situated, her breathing centre. Although she feels depressed about finding it difficult to express herself fully, there’s ‘light’ here, like light at the end of the tunnel. When we can get to the bottom of our feelings, we can see the light about our blocks and how to overcome them. I wonder whether Andrea also suffers from having too many ideas (head stuff, like hair), that she doesn’t know how to ground (make happen), so she feels smothered by too many ideas and no action. The chest is at the bottom of the bed, near Andrea’s feet, and the place for feet to be is on the ground. If Andrea can just ‘pull down’ one or two of those ideas and ground them – make them happen – then there’s light at the end of the tunnel!

Strange creatures, dogs and humans ...

Strange creatures, dogs and humans …

And what about Brig’s dream of the dog that wasn’t, the dog that was, in fact, a bit of lamb’s fry? I won’t spill those beans in this blog (you can get to know Brig and her dreams by tuning into the show next time I’m on), but it does remind me of the time Michael and I took a dog we were looking after for a walk. The dog had been a bit porky, and he trimmed up in our care and was looking pretty good. He had a bit of arthritis in his paws, so he was a plodder to walk. On that particular day we took a slightly longer walk than usual, and we had to slow our pace to match his drag towards the end. Suddenly, home in sight, the leash slackened, and Michael said, “He’s picked up his pace, got a bit of energy now he can see home.” I looked back and there was the dog, still plodding along slowly and faithfully, a long way back down the road, while the empty leash trailed behind Michael. The next day we tossed his old fat dog collar and bought him a nice slim one, though I think the sight of us dragging a leash is all it takes to keep him plodding along. Strange creatures – dogs and humans – conditioned to believe in limitations long since gone.

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Dream interpretation: Radio 2UE, Finding home

Vanessa called Radio 2UE when I was interpreting dreams on Tim Webster’s afternoon show earlier this month, to ask about her recurring dream which she’d been having for six months.

She was intrigued because a previous caller had asked about her recurring dream of never being able to find the right train station, or catch the train, and I had said that this was a common dream related to not getting going with goals, or taking the wrong approach, and that exploring these dreams reveals the personal reasons why each dreamer is experiencing these blocks.

“But I do get to the right train stations,” said Vanessa, “and I catch the right trains, buses, planes and taxis in my dreams, but for six months none of these dream vehicles have got me home and I’m left, in the dream, feeling distressed about not being able to get home.”

As with any recurring dream, the issue the dream is reflecting can be traced back to the first time you had the dream, so Vanessa’s dream related to an issue that began six months ago and was still troubling her.

“Do you feel that you’re on track, following the goals you set yourself, but somehow not getting time to yourself,” I asked, ‘as if you’re not finding that special place within your heart where you feel ‘at home’ and at peace with the world?”

It hit home (oops). Vanessa related to this, and this had indeed been the situation for the past six months.

Understanding a dream brings us awareness, and that awareness can help us to make better decisions for ourselves. This can be accelerated by applying dream alchemy, and I suggested to Vanessa that for her dream alchemy she visualise herself back in her dream, on the train, only this time arriving home, imagining the best possible kind of home, both in the material sense and in the emotional sense. What this does is train (oops again) Vanessa’s unconscious mind to become comfortable with permitting herself to enjoy coming home to her heart. This done, she will find herself taking waking life actions that support and therefore manifest this.

Home is where the heart is, if only we allow ourselves access.

In synchronicity, my son, Euan, and his band, The Rooftops, released their new single, Something so familiar, from their upcoming album on Friday.

In synchronicity, my son, Euan, and his band, The Rooftops, released their new single, Something so familiar, from their upcoming album on Friday.

In synchronicity, my son, Euan, and his band, The Rooftops, released their new single, Something so familiar, from their upcoming album on Friday. For a limited time you can download a free copy here.  As Euan says, “Ever explored the world, had the time of your life, missed home and come back to realise that it’s actually the best place in the world?  ‘Something So Familiar’ is a song about coming home …”

Let the lyrics and the music reveal more. Enjoy & share.

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Reveal your saboteur

Tom and Kim both dreamed they were running late for their plane.

Tom and Kim both dreamed they were running late for their plane.

Imagine that both Tom and Kim had the same dream. Each dreamed he was on his way to the airport to fly to another city for a work meeting when he realised he had left his ticket at home. He wondered whether he had time to go back home and get his ticket, or whether he would miss the plane. The dream ended there. What does it mean?

The in-depth interpretation depends on how Tom and Kim each felt in their dream, and this applies to most dream interpretations.

Tom felt excited by the challenge.

Tom felt excited by the challenge.

Tom felt panicked by the delay, and then excited by the challenge. The adrenalin rush of racing back home to get the ticket in time to catch the plane would put him on a high that would energise him right through the meeting, and impress his work colleagues with his ‘can do’, risk-taking, adventurous approach.

Kim felt relieved and took the afternoon off.

Kim felt relieved and took the afternoon off.

Kim felt immediately relieved. He was off the hook with a perfect excuse. Forgetting his ticket meant he didn’t have to face his colleagues. He fleetingly wondered whether he had forgotten his ticket accidentally-on-purpose, but dismissed the thought as soon as he realised he could now spend the afternoon relaxing and playing golf.

Tom and Kim’s dreams were about why they have been experiencing delays in achieving their goals. Both dreams reveal a saboteur element: both Tom and Kim are creating the very delays that daily despair them. “Why,” they each moan, “does life keep blocking me?”

Tom craves praise for achieving against the odds.

As you can see by examining their dream feelings, Tom loves the thrill of an obstacle course and believes the challenge of the added difficulties gives him a performance edge and wins him praise.

He unconsciously creates delays to experience a high because he believes he needs the rush to perform, and craves praise for achieving against the odds.

Kim creates delays to safeguard himself from pressure.

Kim creates delays to safeguard himself from pressure.

 

 

Kim, on the other hand, fears achieving his goals or facing up to his abilities, whether or not he’s equal to the task.

He unconsciously creates delays to safeguard him from this pressure, though he won’t admit this to anyone – including himself – in daily life. Sometimes he catches a glimpse of his modus operandi, but then swings denial into place deftly with his golf clubs.

Here’s the tip. When you write out a dream, add your feelings. Make sure you don’t write about how you would feel if this happened to you in waking life. Write the feelings you felt while you were in the dream. Then highlight the feeling words, and link them together in the same order to form a flow.

For example, Tom’s would read: panicked -> excited -> high -> energised -> impressive -> risky -> adventurous.

Kim’s would read: relieved-> excused-> dismissive->relaxed.

Do this for your dreams, and ask where this pattern is playing out in your life. You will see your life in quite a different light. Once you are aware of this pattern, you have the power to change it.

[Extract from 101 Dream Interpretation Tips, Jane Teresa Anderson]

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Radio ABC Victoria: Joy flight

A dream joy flight

A dream joy flight

“I dream of flying a single propeller plane,” said David, who called me this afternoon on Kathy Bedford’s Statewide Drive show on Radio ABC Victoria. “I take off and although I don’t know how to drive it, I land it safely.”

David feels ecstatic in his recurring dream.

I’m sure David said ‘drive’ not ‘fly’, and if my ears served me well, this is a clue to interpretation, as you will see.

David summarised his dream in a few short sentences, yet he took time to detail the type of plane: a single propeller plane. He was also the single pilot.

The dream plane is a one man plane, and suggests David is beginning to gain confidence in ‘flying solo’ in some area of his life. He may run his own business, or be considering it. He may be newly single, or he may be branching out on his own in some other way.

The beauty of David’s dream is that he doesn’t let not knowing how to ‘drive’ the plane hold him back. And even though he doesn’t know how to drive it, it turns out that he can not only pilot it but enjoy the process and land it safely too. What a buzz!

Because this is a recurring dream, David is probably still exploring his confidence to ‘take off’ and follow his intuition, and the dream probably comes up when he surprises himself with his progress. David could relate to this.

Your unconscious mind expresses itself in your dreams, and when you describe a dream your unconscious mind sometimes gets a look in too. David’s unconscious mind told me that his dream was also about ‘drive’ or motivation.

He may be finding it difficult to drive or motivate himself some days, but his dream shows that taking the first step is all it takes – the rest just happens naturally.

Or he feels he doesn’t know enough about driving his business – marketing, financing, getting customers – and again the dream shows that there is a part of David that intuitively knows what to do.

This is an uplifting dream with a positive, grounded result. To reinforce his confidence in ‘flying solo’ David could do a visualisation while he’s awake (a dream alchemy practice), in which he relives his dream and the sensations of confidence, joy and success. The more he repeats this, the more he will find, in his waking life, that he somehow just automatically knows what to do.

(To stay informed about upcoming radio and TV appearances, so you can listen in or phone in with your dream, please LIKE my FaceBook Page.)

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Episode 39 The Dream Show: Gin with the tonic

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A new podcast every Friday. Listen here or subscribe on iTunes.

A new podcast every Friday. Listen here or subscribe on iTunes.

Episode 39 of our free weekly podcast, THE DREAM SHOW, is now up.

Kate is my guest on today’s show. Kate dreamed of being on a plane, well, actually she was in a drawing of a plane wondering whether to sip the free gin and tonic that manifested, cartoon-like, before her eyes.

It’s a fun dream that uncovers a block that has been limiting an aspect of Kate’s life.

It’s a fun chat too, so listen in for some entertaining insights that will enrich your understanding of both dreams and life.

And if you’ve had dreams of sitting school tests, or dreams of a deceased parent, there’s extra insight for you at the end, when Kate asks about these recurring dream themes.

You can listen here (Episode 39)

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Episode 34 The Dream Show: How a plane dream changed James’ life

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Plane dreams: what do they mean?

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Episode 34 of our free weekly podcast, The Dream Show, is now up.

Can a dream interpretation change your life?

On today’s podcast show, James, whose dream was interpreted in Episode 11, returns to the show to share the story of what happened next.

He’s celebrating big time, as you’ll hear, and he’s also reveling in the amazing synchronicities that have manifested along the way. That’s the power of dream alchemy!

James’ dream was about an airplane. The plane was breaking up, mid-flight, but then morphed into a more innovative futuristic model. How did this dream relate to James’ life, and how did he take action on the insights he gained from having his dream interpreted? And how has his life changed as a result? Listen in to find out!

Following my chat with James, I take a deeper look at other kinds of plane dreams and what they can mean. You’ll pick up plenty of dream interpretation tips from this podcast.

Listen here (episode 34).

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