Tag Archives: limitation

Episode 120 The Dream Show: Always the passenger

A virtual coffee

Always the passenger

Gwynne is my guest with a dream about finding a camera with a shocking picture on the viewfinder.

There’s a theme of lost and found, and another of being driven around – always the passenger, never the driver – and sitting so far back in the vehicle that she even falls out of the car.

Who or what is lost? Who or what is found? And how does the shocking picture help Gwynne – once I’ve interpreted her dream – to understand and transform the deep programming that has been limiting her waking life results?

Many will relate to Gwynne’s dream, and that shocking picture carries a dramatic quality that will assist anyone whose life experience is limited by the common programming it represents.

The Dream Show, a free monthly podcast with Jane Teresa AndersonListen as Gwynne and I discuss her dream, and hear her responses as she relates the dream to what is happening in her waking life.

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And it bloomed …

Plant A Garden, by Marylou Falstreau

“One day she decided to plant a garden of her own … and it bloomed.”

I know that as you contemplate Marylou Falstreau’s print, a garden of your own calls to you. Not a physical garden, but something that you’d love to create, become, or do, something that’s completely of your own.

Artist Marylou Falstreau was inspired by a dream to create her Woman and the Hourglass series of prints and cards, and, being totally unique and of her own, they’ve bloomed and found their way into shops, homes, hearts, and minds.

I love the sense of surprise – ‘and it bloomed!’ How often have you planted other people’s ideas, cultivated other people’s expectations, and wondered what might have happened if you had planted your own?

A style that bloomed into what we now recognise as iconic Matisse.

A style that bloomed into what we now recognise as iconic Matisse.

I went to the Matisse Drawing Life exhibition at Brisbane’s Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA) last weekend. Henri Matisse drew from life every morning, before he got down to the work of the day, and there were some 300 drawings on show for us to view. His earlier drawings were heavily influenced by the prominent artists he studied, his style shifting radically from season to season until he found himself drawing in a style completely of his own, a style that bloomed into what we now recognise as iconic Matisse.

We can’t all be Matisse – and his apparently simple style is very hard to emulate, as we discovered when we sat in The Drawing Room, an interactive part of the exhibition, a lush Matisse-like studio dotted with stools, easels, and drawing boards, contemplating the smorgasbord of still life on offer, our pencils poised, and poised, and poised. I drew a few squiggles and lines, and had fun. Fun was a rewarding outcome. I discarded the inept squiggles and kept the Matisse souvenir pencil for inspiration.

What will you plant?

No, we can’t all be Matisse, but like Matisse, or like Marylou Falstreau, we can all create, become, or do, something that’s completely of our own.

No, we can’t all be Matisse, but like Matisse, or like Marylou Falstreau, we can all create, become, or do, something that’s completely of our own. All we have to do is simply decide, one day, to plant a garden of our own … and it will bloom!

Tip 1: If you’re not sure what you want to create, become, or do, pay attention to your dreams as they reveal the limiting beliefs – largely those built around your past and present experiences of other people’s expectations of you – that block your connection to this knowing.

Tip 2: Pick a number from 1-27, and count through Marylou’s Women and the Hourglass prints to add some synchronistic insight.

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The leashes that bind

Brig dreamed of taking her dog for a walk, only on the end of the leash was a ...

Dreams, even when they’re scary, can be very playful. Some are laugh out loud funny, like Brig’s dream of taking her dog for a walk only instead of her dog what was on the end of the leash was a bit of lamb’s fry (offal). Deep and meaningful though the dream was, you’ve just got to laugh, and Brig’s co-presenter and anchor on Radio Mix 101.1FM Melbourne certainly made meat of that one on their breakfast show last week. It was an offal dream for Brig, but perfect breakfast fodder for the team, and we managed to get to the bottom of it pretty quickly.

Yvonne phoned the station with a dream of being a passenger in a plane, enjoying her trip until she looked out the window and noticed the plane had no wings. What was keeping it airborne? She looked towards the cockpit – chickens were harnessed to the plane keeping it aloft. That was fine by Yvonne until she remembered, in the dream, that chickens have clipped wings. She painted a playful picture, and look at those plays on words – cockpit and chickens. We’re ‘chicken’ when we’re scared, and Yvonne was pretty scared at the thought of being at the mercy of a band of wingless chickens. A wingless plane, wingless chickens, and yet the plane was safely flying along and getting somewhere.

Yvonne was pretty scared at the thought of being at the mercy of a band of wingless chickens.

Yvonne was pretty scared at the thought of being at the mercy of a band of wingless chickens.

Yvonne’s dream suggests she can achieve far more than she thinks and fears. She may fear that her plans and ideas don’t have wings, but they do. There’s so much more to Yvonne’s dream than breakfast radio allows time to say, but simply looking for word play is fun and gives a clue to the interpretation.

Rachel’s dream of dating a dentist who gave her a gift of a dental cup containing dental floss and mouthwash made us all smile, and she related to my brief interpretation about taking a new attitude to how she communicates – clean, clear, fresh, positive words and intent. “Yes,” she said, “that makes sense.” How playful of her dream to go for a dental hygiene theme to encapsulate this.

Andrea’s recurring dream was more frightening. She dreams of being smothered by hair while in bed, and sees a chest at the bottom of the bed with a light that pulls her down. She wakes up struggling for breath.

My quick on air interpretation was that Andrea’s dream comes up when she feels restricted during the day, as if she can’t breathe to claim her space to express herself, and that this ‘pulls her down’, depresses her. It was spot on, she could relate to it. There’s so much more to her dream, but notice again how helpful it is to look for word play. The chest at the bottom of the bed is also Andrea’s chest, the place where her lungs are situated, her breathing centre. Although she feels depressed about finding it difficult to express herself fully, there’s ‘light’ here, like light at the end of the tunnel. When we can get to the bottom of our feelings, we can see the light about our blocks and how to overcome them. I wonder whether Andrea also suffers from having too many ideas (head stuff, like hair), that she doesn’t know how to ground (make happen), so she feels smothered by too many ideas and no action. The chest is at the bottom of the bed, near Andrea’s feet, and the place for feet to be is on the ground. If Andrea can just ‘pull down’ one or two of those ideas and ground them – make them happen – then there’s light at the end of the tunnel!

Strange creatures, dogs and humans ...

Strange creatures, dogs and humans …

And what about Brig’s dream of the dog that wasn’t, the dog that was, in fact, a bit of lamb’s fry? I won’t spill those beans in this blog (you can get to know Brig and her dreams by tuning into the show next time I’m on), but it does remind me of the time Michael and I took a dog we were looking after for a walk. The dog had been a bit porky, and he trimmed up in our care and was looking pretty good. He had a bit of arthritis in his paws, so he was a plodder to walk. On that particular day we took a slightly longer walk than usual, and we had to slow our pace to match his drag towards the end. Suddenly, home in sight, the leash slackened, and Michael said, “He’s picked up his pace, got a bit of energy now he can see home.” I looked back and there was the dog, still plodding along slowly and faithfully, a long way back down the road, while the empty leash trailed behind Michael. The next day we tossed his old fat dog collar and bought him a nice slim one, though I think the sight of us dragging a leash is all it takes to keep him plodding along. Strange creatures – dogs and humans – conditioned to believe in limitations long since gone.

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Charlie’s bone

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Charlie’s bone

A dog, Charlie, sees a meaty bone tantalisingly just out of reach.

A dog, Charlie, sees a meaty bone tantalisingly just out of reach.

A dog, Charlie, sees a meaty bone tantalisingly just out of reach, on the grass, on the other side of a high wire fence. The aroma twitches his nose, moistens his mouth, and fixes his eyes to the tasty prize. The only problem is the fence between where he is now and where he wants to be. It’s too high to jump, too solid to squeeze through. What’s the solution?

Hours pass, and Charlie sits in his garden, totally focussed on the bone. You could say he spent the morning visualising gnawing the bone, imagining how it would taste, how happy he’d be. That’s true. But he was also focussed on that dratted fence, occasionally trying to burrow beneath it, lunge at it, poke his nose through it, each time feeling nothing but its unrelenting resistance barring his way to where he wanted to be.

What’s the tasty bone you’ve been visualising in your life recently? What’s the fence? Have you been spending as much time and energy visualising the fence as visualising the bone? Which do you think will manifest, getting the bone or strengthening the resistance of the fence?

Do you find yourself analysing the analogy, picking holes in it?

Do you find yourself analysing the analogy, picking holes in it?

Does this little story resonate with your heart (does it feel right, does it deliver an Aha?), or do you find your head analysing the analogy, picking holes in it?

Legends, myths, fairy tales and parables are lovingly passed through generations because they offer insights and solutions from the safety zone of a story.

The story does not judge the listener or tell them what to do. If the listener resonates with the story, inner shifts begin. If she doesn’t, it isn’t the right story for her current predicament.

An analogy works best if it’s not too close to home, or even not close to species. Think Disney, Pixar, movies featuring animals, fables. Why is this?

You’re not a dog. You probably gag at the thought of eating a raw bone. Yet maybe you resonated at some level with my simple little story about Charlie.

An analogy works best if it’s not too close to home, or even not close to species.

An analogy works best if it’s not too close to home, or even not close to species.

In fact, the story may have a deeper impact on you than a realistic story featuring someone like you in your exact predicament. The more the details resemble your life, the harder it is for you to see solutions because you start to lock into the way you see your life, with all your familiar fences, obstacles and problems included. Your blind spots engage. Comfort zone prevails. But when the story takes you away from the life you know and gets you to look through the eyes of, say, a dog, you are suspended from your attachment to your own situation for long enough to see new possibilities.

I might have told a different Charlie analogy. How about the one where Charlie focuses so intently on the fence that he realises it is nothing but a myriad atoms floating in space, giving the impression of solidity, so he just walks through it?

Or how about the one where Charlie’s frustration with the fence makes him bark louder than ever before so that a passing stranger hears his cry for help and tosses him the bone?

Analogies are full of holes. Mere atoms of storytelling breath suspended in voids big enough to step through. But isn’t that the point? Aren’t analogies simply vehicles to transport you to the next … ah, anyone spot an analogy coming?

Dreams can be seen as analogies.

Dreams can be seen as analogies.

Dreams can be seen as analogies. Dreams reflect the last 24-48 hours of your conscious and unconscious experiences, compare these to your past experiences, update your personal worldview, and project forward, based on this blueprint of your expectations. The resulting dream, encompassing all this stuff, is mostly a production of your creative right brain. Left brain logic doesn’t get a look in. Approach a dream as an analogy of your current mindset, and you’re well on the way to accurate interpretation.

For example, you dream of being lost, unable to find your way: where, in the last two days, did you feel lost at some level, emotionally, intellectually, spiritually? Or you dream of being bogged down in mud: where, in the last two days, did you feel, at some level, bogged down? Or you dream of seeing a tasty reward, out of reach on the other side of a tall fence: where, in the last two days, did you feel blocked from attaining something  rewarding?

When you interpret a dream, identifying the analogy is a good starting point. It helps you to relate your dream to the waking life situation it applies to.

Then you can bring in all the interpretation tools you’ve learned from me along the way (through my articles, books, podcasts and so on) to interpret the details, uncover how your mindset is affecting your life experience, and flesh out (oh, that bone again) personal meaning.

Just as analogies can be full of holes, dreams – being analogies - can reveal the holes in the way you look at your life.

Just as analogies can be full of holes, dreams – being analogies – can reveal the holes in the way you look at your life.

Just as analogies can be full of holes, dreams – being analogies – can reveal the holes in the way you look at your life. And just as analogies can inspire insights and solutions to problems, dreams – being analogies – can do this too.

And just as the best legends, myths, fairy tales and Disney productions are analogies whipped up into spellbinding stories, you can whip your dreams up into spellbinding dream alchemy practices. Simply write an inspirational dream as a children’s story, or rewrite a dream that reveals a personal limitation as a children’s story with a happy ending.

If you resonated with Charlie, spin some magic right now by writing a one page children’s story about how Charlie finally got his bone.

[Copyright Jane Teresa Anderson, May 2010. First published as a Dream Sight article.]

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Episode 45 The Dream Show: Prickly cactus

A virtual coffee

A new podcast every Friday. Listen here or subscribe on iTunes.

A new podcast every Friday. Listen here or subscribe on iTunes.

Episode 45 of our free weekly podcast, THE DREAM SHOW, is now up.

Today’s guest, Suzanne, has a prickly cactus obstructing her way in her dream. Mud to one side, rocks to the other, and no shoes to protect her feet.

Could the letter written in red ink and carefully folded into three help?

Well, yes, because everything becomes clear when a dream is interpreted.

If you love a bit of dream detective work, you’ll love following the clues as we reach Aha upon Aha as Suzanne and I chat about her dream.

Listen as Suzanne makes all the connections to what’s happening in her waking life, and as she notices her physical body responses to the interpretation.

Does Suzanne discover the way forward? Oh yes, and there’s plenty of insight for you too: listen!

You can listen here (Episode 45)

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Comfort zone: the things we do!

Comfort zone: the things we do!

Comfort zone: the things we do!

When was the last time you stepped out of a comfort zone? What did you do? How did it feel? How did the experience enrich your life?

We create and inhabit comfort zones to protect ourselves from facing our fears. We erect boundaries beyond which we prefer not to step. Often, though, the greatest danger lies inside the comfort zone, as this dream (posted to our old dream forums), portrays so vividly:

“I was nursing a baby and the baby was me. She was tired so I put her on my shoulder and she started to drop off. Then I got the idea of putting her into a 2 litre milk bottle, a nice cosy place I thought! The milk came up to her chest. She obviously found it comfortable and dropped off to sleep.

But then I kept having problems. I realised I had to take the lid off or she would suffocate. The milk was slopping into her mouth and making her cough, and I thought she might get chilled too.

I was walking round a tourist area and wanted to sit down for a coffee but I was too preoccupied with the baby.

Then I wondered how I was going to get her out of the bottle again. I would have to cut the top off. But she looked fairly comfortable and was soon asleep so I left her there.”

Did you notice all the references in this dream to comfort zones? There’s the ‘nice cosy place’ which she found ‘comfortable’ and where, despite the obvious dangers, she remained comfortable.

The things we do! This dreamer really wanted to explore unknown territory (the tourist area) and was on the verge of realising that her familiar comfort zone was so restrictive it was potentially suffocating. Even though she could see solutions, she ultimately settled for what seemed ‘fairly comfortable’. She  was limiting her potential, and probably not achieving her desires, by suffocating in a comfort zone instead of stepping out into new territory to grow.

If you ever need encouragement to step beyond a comfort zone so you can grow, personally and spiritually, remember the baby in the milk bottle.

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Adapt

Your environment is your teacher

Your environment is your teacher

Yesterday I invited FaceBook Fans to pick a number between 1 and 365 to get a reading from my book The Compass. (There are 365 readings in the book.)

Debbie picked number 172, ‘Adapt’. Here’s the full reading:

 

172: ADAPT

 

WHY?

Your environment is your teacher.

 

CLARITY

What changes are challenging you?

Where are you feeling restricted?

Imagine accepting the restrictions you are feeling. How would your life change in the long term? Imagine accepting the challenge of breaking free from the feeling of restriction. What changes in attitude would you need to make to achieve this? What are the changes forcing you to examine about yourself, and your life? How are you going to respond?

 

ALCHEMY PRACTICE

Imagine a prehistoric fish living happily in a crystal clear pond. As years go by, she births hundreds of baby fish, and their food supply begins to dwindle. Her babies begin to mysteriously disappear. She suffers deep despair. Were her children eaten? Did they die of starvation? The more she despairs, the more the crystal waters of the pond get murky and dark. Her old happy life has gone. She can hardly see ahead through the dark water, and there is little food left. Life has become severely restricted. What should she do? She’d never been adventurous, always preferring the safe pond waters, but she is no longer safe here. To survive, she needs to change her attitude, to take a risk instead of opting for safety, to leave the pond in search of a better life. Seeing some leaves breaking the surface of the pond, she reaches up to nibble, and keeps on nibbling until she realises she is standing on dry land! Her children, now grown, are all there to greet her. They look strangely different, but she recognises them as her own. She is the mother of the first amphibians, and now she too can breathe and walk on land. Why she had not known this before?

From The Compass – your guide to your best future, copyright Jane Teresa Anderson

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