Tag Archives: dream dictionary

Fast fix

Sidney Nolan: Ned Kelly 1946

An original signed sketch by Sir Sidney Nolan, one of Australia’s best known painters, recently sold on eBay for $113.61. It would probably have sold for thousands if it hadn’t been pan fried. Yes, you did read that correctly. Pan fried.

The idea to pan fry the sketch - a portrait of the dreamer’s grandfather - came in a dream.

The idea to pan fry the sketch – a portrait of the dreamer’s grandfather – came in a dream.

The idea to cook the sketch – a portrait of the dreamer’s grandfather – came in a dream.

“In the dream I had an exhibition of drawings which had all been crumbed and deep-fried. I’d never seen anything like that before,” explained artist Andy Wear.

Wear was inspired to follow his dream literally, exploring the question of valuing a work based on the artist’s signature rather than on the quality of the art. “I find it intriguing that just because a great artist does it, it’s treasured,” he said.

Following a dream literally also blinds you to the more meaningful personal insight you can gain by understanding your dream at a symbolic level.

Following a dream literally also blinds you to the more meaningful personal insight you can gain by understanding your dream at a symbolic level.

Many brilliant inventions, ideas, and creative solutions, have been triggered by dreams. While following a dream literally may be rewarding, it may also be disastrous or misguided.

Following a dream literally also blinds you to the more meaningful personal insight you can gain by understanding your dream at a symbolic level.

I don’t have any more details of Wear’s dream, but the notion of an exhibition of crumbed and deep-fried drawings reminds me of the hunger for fast fix dream interpretation that people new to the subject often expect.

I encounter it frequently in the form of well-intentioned questions on Twitter, when people new to exploring their dreams manage to get their dream and their request to tell them what it means down to the 140 characters that Twitter requires, clearly expecting me to be able to deliver a fast fix in up to 140 characters back.

People ask me what their dreams mean on Twitter. What? In 140 characters or less?

People ask me what their dreams mean on Twitter. What? In 140 characters or less?

I understand this. Dream novices think you can look up the meaning of a dream in a dream dictionary, and expect a dream expert – like me – to be that instant dream dictionary.

I love that people are interested in their dreams and what they mean, and I’d love to deliver fast fixes, but that’s not how you get meaningful, useful insight, the kind you can take action on to create meaningful,  long-lasting, deeply rewarding change in your life.

We live in a fast world, and all hail to speed and efficiency when it gets us results and frees time and energy for us to enjoy. Interpreting dreams takes time, and the only way a dreamer can speed it up is to get a professional interpretation. Absorbing that interpretation, pondering and understanding the new insight it delivers, doing the dream alchemy to reprogram limiting beliefs, and taking appropriate action: these take time.

I’d love to deliver fast fixes, but that’s not how you get meaningful, useful insight, the kind you can take action on to create meaningful, long-lasting, deeply rewarding change in your life.

I’d love to deliver fast fixes, but that’s not how you get meaningful, useful insight, the kind you can take action on to create meaningful, long-lasting, deeply rewarding change in your life.

I’m not going to do the metaphor about the time it takes to grow, harvest, shop, prepare, and cook good food as opposed to popping into McDonalds for a fast fix.

Oops, I think I just have.

Next time you find yourself taking a dream literally, stop. Have a deeper look.

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Episode 72 The Dream Show: A DSDD workout

Thank you for your help

A new podcast every Friday. Listen here or subscribe on iTunes.

Episode 72 of our free weekly podcast, THE DREAM SHOW, is now up.

My guest today, Dail, shares her experience of running one of her dreams through our DIY free interpretation program. (Note, April 2013: After 13 years of use we’ve now retired this program.)

You pop your dream in one end, answer some short, simple questions, and emerge at the other end of the process with a clearer idea of what your dream means and how it relates to your life.

Dail’s dream involved enticing a lover for the powerful hit of being in control, but what – or who – is causing all those ripples behind that Arabian tapestry hanging on the wall? Throughout Dail’s dream is a theme she often meets in her dreams, being lost in a big city.

She thought running a fun dream with a mix of bizarre symbols and a recurring theme would give the DSDD a good workout, and she was right. Join us as Dail runs her dream through the process, and witness her results.

In this episode I also share listener Rob’s experience of creating alchemy from a tiny dream fragment with successful results. If they can do it – you can do it. Just begin.

You can listen here (Episode 72)

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Your personal dream dictionary

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Your personal dream dictionary

What does an elephant mean to you?

What does an elephant mean to you?

Buying a dream dictionary from a bookshop is not really going to be very helpful to you because most dream symbols are personal to the dreamer.

An elephant in Joe’s dream might mean something completely different to an elephant in Matt’s dream, for example.

Joe might be a cartoonist who learned his first cartooning skills drawing an elephant character, so an elephant in his dream might symbolise ‘practice’ or ‘new skills’.

Matt might have been upset as a child to see an elephant trapped in a small cage at the zoo, so an elephant in his dream might symbolise ‘trapped’ or helpless’.

There are plenty of tips throughout this blog, my dream website, books, podcasts and so on to help you to discover the meanings of your very personal dream symbols, so consider compiling your own dream dictionary.

The easiest way to do this is to buy a notebook or journal with A-Z page tags, and enter your symbols as you discover them.

If paper and handwriting is not for you, you can compile your personal dream dictionary using our Dream Sight Diary Database (get your free download here).

When you record your dreams over the months and years, you’ll notice they recycle many of your symbols, so you’ll find yourself consulting your personal dream dictionary frequently. Make writing your dictionary easy by adding just one or two symbols a day. It will soon build up into an invaluable reference, one you will use for many years to come.

Start it today!

[Extract from 101 Dream Interpretation Tips, Jane Teresa Anderson, pub 2007]

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Free dream e-journal

Record, search & interpret your dreams using our free Dream Sight Diary Database

Record, search & interpret your dreams using our free Dream Sight Diary Database

Imagine being able to instantly search all your dreams to find all those featuring a certain symbol, person, theme, or word. You could call up all your car dreams, for example, or all your dreams featuring water, animals, an ex lover, a place, or anything you wish.

Imagine being able to do a basic interpretation on any dream by being led through key questions and typing in your responses.

You can do all this and much, much more, when you download the free computer program, Dream Sight Diary Database, that Belinda Hodge conceived, developed and produced for us, based on my methods of dream interpretation and alchemy. (Note, April 2013: After 13 years of use, we retired this program. Times have changed. One day we’ll turn it into an app.)

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Dream symbols: The personality question

What's the personality of a tennis ball?

What’s the personality of a tennis ball?

Throw out any dream dictionaries lurking on your bookshelves. The symbols in your dream are all about you. So how can you discover their meaning? Here’s an easy, fun, and accurate way.

Imagine your dream symbol is a tennis ball, for example.

Ask, “What is the personality of a tennis ball?”

Answer fast. Don’t allow time to think.

You might say, “Bouncy, happy, team-orientated.”

I might say, “Can’t make up its mind – back and forward, back and forward.”

Someone else might say, “Catch me if you can!”

When you do this fast, your unconscious mind comes up with the right answer for you. So YOUR tennis ball dream might be about bouncy team work, mine might be about indecision, and someone else’s might hint at dodge tactics.

Build your own dream dictionary each time you do this exercise and discover the meaning of your personal dream symbols.

[Extract from 101 Dream Interpretation Tips, Jane Teresa Anderson]

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