Category Archives: Dream interpretation

Posts about dream interpretation, or where dreams are interpreted.

Episode 162 The Dream Show: The hidden key

A virtual coffee

Episode 162 The Dream Show The hidden key

My guest, Domonique, asks about a dream that begins with a trip in a car that looks like a spaceship and ends with her firm refusal to be a witness for the Court Marshalls against her friend, Jules. “I’m older than I look,” she states, richly, and melodiously, standing her ground.

There are two hidden keys featured in the dream, and Domonique knows where they are and how to lay her hands on them. How do these dream keys relate to her life? How long have they been hidden? How have they just come to light, and what can she do with them from this day forward?

There are mysteries to playfully explore as we delve into this dream: why does the car look like a spaceship, why is Jules being evicted from his apartment, and what does the letter T stand for?

You might like to notice the kind of questions I ask, and see how you can apply similar questioning when you’re exploring your own dreams. There’s some word play and recurring themes at work in this dream, and you’ll pick up tips on how to identify these in your dreams and how to gain deeper self understanding as a result.

As with all our guests, Domonique relates the analysis to what’s happening in her waking life and shares personal insights that enrich and inspire all who listen.

Listen

You might also enjoy

The folds of time

The folds of time

The Dream Show with Jane Teresa Anderson

More episodes to enjoy and share

Share

All the world’s a stage

All the world's a stage, Jane Teresa Anderson

The moment has come to step out on stage and perform in front of an audience but you haven’t prepared. Worse than this, you know zilch. It’s a common dream theme, and you’ve probably had a variation of it at some point in your life. What did you make of it? How did you relate it to your life? How did it help you to understand yourself more deeply, or to make a change?

Your dream might involve a theatre performance, giving a presentation at work, teaching a class of eager students, delivering your artwork for public exhibition, flying a plane, or any number of situations, all of which come down to you not being able to deliver because you haven’t prepared or don’t know enough.

In a recent dream, I was to play a classical orchestral piece on keyboard. It was to be a solo performance. The auditorium was packed, the audience looked discerning, an anticipatory silence descended, and all eyes were on me, seated at the keyboard at the very centre of the room. Not only had I not studied or practised the piece, but I’m not a musician. I might have been able to play Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star with one finger, but then again, maybe not. I wondered what to do. I thought I was alone in this, but to my surprise the conductor came into the room, sat opposite me across the keyboard, and held me in her mesmerising gaze. I woke up before playing a note, although now I knew what to do.

Every dream is as unique as every dreamer, so there’s no blanket interpretation that applies to everyone for this kind of dream theme. All dreams reflect your conscious and unconscious experiences of the previous 1-2 days, and it’s most helpful to begin by looking at a dream as a metaphor for what’s been going on for you during those couple of days. Look for the metaphor in your dream. What feels accurate? Where in your life did you feel unprepared? Or was your metaphor more along the lines of over-promising and under-delivering? Or being over-prepared, leaving no room for changing your approach? Or being fearful of judgement? Or feeling you lack talent? You’ll know when you’ve found the connection. You’ll feel a tingly sensation, a kind of knowing, though your logical mind may say, ‘No way!’ Respect the tingly sensation, explore.

There is so much more to dream analysis, but this first step can open your eyes and bless you with new understanding about yourself, your inner world, your unconscious mindset.

My dream reflected the decision I had just made about the new book I’m writing this year, and the last throes of inner conflict about a change of writing approach and style. I came through. By the end of the dream I had resolved the conflict and knew what to do. I woke up feeling confident and energised. I was ready to begin, to place my fingers on my laptop keyboard, to orchestrate words into being.

My previous books were all planned in detail before I began writing. I named chapters, summarised the intended content chapter by chapter, decided upon a style, created a template for each chapter, specified the path I would take to guide readers through a process, or to get my message across. There was rationality in the structure, a solid plan. I was so prepared for each book that I even knew how long it would take me to write. My writing days were planned, x number of writing days at y number of words equals first draft completed by z date. And it worked for each of the six paperback books I have written. Safe within that structure, the actual words I chose were free to find their own expression, as if I were the observer, to surprise me with new twists, insights, metaphors, to write their own examples, to make me smile.

So I have decided on a complete change in approach and style for this new book. I haven’t prepared in my usual ‘classical’ way. I haven’t prepared a structure, marked out days in my diary, plotted the path or even the message. I feel the music. My dream reminded me that some part of me knows how to conduct the flow, to hold my attention in the mesmerised moment. All I need to do is lean into the keyboard and let it flow.

That much I understood at the end of my dream. On the caffeinated wings of my morning coffee, I realised that some part of me is also the musical keyboard in the dream, the instrument or channel for the music, no doubt conducted by my mesmerised in-the-moment intuitive self, free to break free from a pre-planned, logical structure. (Sticking with the metaphor, this may sound like big-noting myself and my abilities, but in dream analysis it’s helpful to look at everything as well as everyone in the dream as representing something about the dreamer.) In short, if I get stuck while I’m writing, I will imagine being the music. This is a form of dream alchemy, moving into a potent dream symbol, giving it – and yourself – more life.

Now, dear discerning audience, there are no big promises here. I may write something wonderful, something inspirational, something profound, or I may write something more akin to a one-fingered rendition of Twinkle Twinkle Little Star, but whatever it is, I will enjoy the process.

The night before this dream, I dreamed I was on stage performing in a Shakespeare play. Everyone else knew their lines. I didn’t. I hadn’t prepared. But I got by. As I whispered to one of the other actors, “It’s ok, I don’t know the lines, but I know the general gist”. Much to the other actors’ amusement, I reframed Shakespeare’s beautiful poetry to fit the theme, and even had the audience laughing at one point with my Shakespearean puns. I’m sure they were far funnier in my dream, and I would certainly have been booed off the stage in waking life, but, as a precursor to my keyboard dream, it rather fits the bill, don’t you think?

You might also enjoy

Dream drummer

Dream drummer

Rosewood laptop

Rosewood laptop

Share

Episode 160 The Dream Show: I dreamed I had died

A virtual coffee

Episode 160 The Dream Show: I dreamed I had died

My guest, Alexandra, dreamed she had died. She stood on the path outside the church, and calmly watched the priests emerge from the funeral service into the courtyard, dressed in celebration regalia emblazoned with a glowing fleur-de-lys pattern. They walked in her direction, carrying trays of silver containers, as if bringing her – in her soul form – an offering.

Alexandra’s dream was short, but deeply meaningful. As you’ll hear, Alexandra describes the feeling of standing on the path as being like an out of the body experience, and says she’s had that experience once before, in her waking life. This is a key to understanding her dream, and you’ll hear Alexandra share an experience she’s never shared before.

The Dream Show with Jane Teresa AndersonWhen we talk about a dream, our unconscious mind is engaged – just as it was during the dream – and it often prompts us to recall experiences that are related to what was going on in our life at the time of the dream. You’ll witness that whole process – and the insight and healing it brings – as you listen to this episode.

Listen

Listen to more episodes

Related articles you might enjoy

Things that go bump in the night

Things that go bump in the night

To dream of death means ...

To dream of death means …

Share

Episode 159 The Dream Show: The old and the new

A virtual coffee

Episode 159 The Dream Show: The old and the new

Patti, my guest, was keen talk about her dream because she’s at a pivotal point in her life. She’s taking time out, making major decisions, and wanting to gather as much insight as she can to assist her in creating the shape of her future.

Patti has worked with me before on a dream and found the dream alchemy profoundly life-changing, so when she noticed signs in this new dream of dilemmas and not being able to see her way clearly, she decided to enlist my help while sharing the process with you on The Dream Show.

The Dream Show with Jane Teresa AndersonPatti’s dream features two bikes, her new one, and one she had 10-20 years ago. At one point she’s riding in the dark, unable to see clearly, frightened of crashing. At another point she panics about leaving the front tyre of her old bike behind. There are places to back out of, places to explore and enjoy, and a mysterious DVD that Patti would prefer to check out than buy for the $43 asking price. Why $43?

Join Patti and me as we journey into her dream, relate it to what’s going on in her life, draw the deeper insights she’s seeking, and create dream alchemy for her to do to ensure best outcomes.

Listen

Listen to more episodes

Related articles you might enjoy

Who would have thought?

Who would have thought?

Lottery win

Lottery win

Share

The secret of life

The Secret of Life

When I was about six or seven, an aunt gave me an autograph book for my birthday. I can still picture it, a padded matt white vinyl cover with an illustration of a modish 1960s lady, pen poised in her hand, and lots of different coloured, invitingly blank pages. My dad wanted to be first to write in my book, and he spent what seemed like hours looking through a ‘quote a day’ calendar to find exactly the right saying.

I treasured that book, and all these decades later I can still remember some of the quotes and sayings and who wrote them. I took them all to heart.

My grandmother chose a 1950s favourite:

“Little puffs of powder,
Little dabs of paint,
Make a girl’s complexion,
Look what it ain’t.”

I always took that to mean that too much makeup smothered your authentic beauty, but now I look at the words again, it could also be about the positives of the grownup art of beautification. My grandmother and my mother used puffs of powder and lipstick, nothing else. I just use lipstick. I wonder how much that autograph has influenced me throughout my life.

My school teacher chose:

“Eat no green apples
Or you’ll droop,
Be careful not to get the croup,
Avoid the chickenpox and such,
And don’t fall out of windows much.”

I’d already had the croup and chickenpox, so all I had to do was avoid green apples and windows. I’ve just Googled, so now I know these words were originally penned by Edward Anthony.

I loved the rhyme and rhythm of those autographs, and the thinking they made me do, as a child, because they seemed to be straightforward and yet they weren’t.

Dad sat at the table, surrounded by 365 little tear-off pages from last year’s calendar, arranged into piles of suitable autograph sayings. Finally, he couldn’t decide between two, so I got “The person who knows everything never gets far,” and:

“The secret of life is not to do what you like,
But to like what you do.”

Mr Google hasn’t been able to help me find an original source for Dad’s choice which has both puzzled and inspired me, sometimes to like what I do, and sometimes to do what I like.

Surely the secret, as adopted by Alcoholics Anonymous and other 12-Step programs from Reinhold Niebuhr’s Serenity Prayer is:

“God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,
The courage to change the things I can,
And the wisdom to know the difference.”

Plus a little Buddhist attitude:

“Before Enlightenment chop wood carry water, after Enlightenment, chop wood carry water.”

Where, in your life, have you chosen to like what you do? How has this approach blessed you?

Where, in your life, have you chosen to do something you like, something you otherwise wouldn’t have done if you were focussed on liking what you do? How has this approach blessed you?

Recently I have been enjoying writing my own sayings or musings and popping them onto images to share. Here’s one:

Danced by Love Jane Teresa Anderson

“Driven by fear or
Danced by love?

You choose
Heartbeat by heartbeat.”

Does it resolve the issue of whether to do what you like or to like what you do? What do you think?

The tricky bit is that we often don’t know when our choices and actions are driven by fear. We are all too easily driven by unconscious fear. The other tricky bit is that sometimes we need to discover love and how to be danced by it.

As a dream analyst I am blessed to be able to do the work I like, and to help people look into their dreams to see their unconscious fears and the enormity of their love, to help them know which of their choices in life are driven – consciously or unconsciously – by fear, and to help them surrender to be danced by love.

Consultations

Related articles you might enjoy

Attitude

Attitude

The Princess and the Pea

The Princess and the Pea

 

Share

Episode 158 The Dream Show: A house with potential

A virtual coffee

Episode 158 The Dream Show: A house with potential

Meet Lisa, my guest, who dreamed of a derelict house with a mix of funky and antique furniture, and great views from the steeply sloping garden. Should they buy the house? There were pros and cons, and because this was a dream, some of the cons were pretty outrageous: beds floating in an elevator shaft, a sinkhole in the garden, but, then again, it had some good things going for it too, and they were prepared to do some work.

How to decide between the pros and cons, in the dream and in life? Or are the pros and cons figments of the imagination, dependent on our personal experience, beliefs, and ways of looking at the world?

The Dream Show with Jane Teresa AndersonThere are some strong emotive elements in Lisa’s dream that help her to connect with her deeper feelings and gain fresh positive perspective on her situation.

There’s something for everyone in this episode: tips on dream interpretation, dream alchemy, and life lessons to explore and share. Enjoy.

Listen

Listen to more episodes

Related articles you might enjoy

One small adjustment

One small adjustment

How much does worry weigh

How much does worry weigh?

Share

Episode 157 The Dream Show: Lucid dreaming soul mate

A virtual coffee

Episode 157 The Dream Show: Lucid dreaming soul mate

My guest, Scott, taught himself how to lucid dream when he was a young boy, and has been experimenting in his lucid dreams for the past three decades. Scott shares his experiences, including his lucid dreams of meeting friends who have died. We talk about the pros and cons of controlling dreams, and we look at some recurring dream themes Scott has encountered during this time.

The Dream Show with Jane Teresa AndersonA few weeks ago, Scott dreamed he met a beautiful woman and woke up thinking, “I’m in love!” Listen as we explore this dream, discover how it relates to what’s been happening recently in Scott’s life, and see how Scott can use this new dream insight to assist him as he moves through a powerfully healing transition.

Listen

Listen to more episodes

Related articles you might enjoy

Inception Can you control a dream

Inception – Can you control a dream

Soul Mate Dreams

Soul Mate Dreams

Share

Episode 156 The Dream Show: A spiritual vibe

A virtual coffee

A spiritual vibe

My guest, Liza, dreamed she was violated by a plumber at her grandmother’s house, and yet, as the dream progressed, the positive energy lifted. There was the welcoming of an Aboriginal ghost couple into her current home, and someone commented that there was a beautiful vine growing outside her house and a lovely spiritual vibe inside. Vibe, and vine – do we have some word play going on here?

“Look, I can levitate,” Liza told her Mum, “can you?” As you listen you’ll discover that Liza’s dream is about rising above challenges, integrating ghosts of the past, and finding a spiritual perspective on her life, but I won’t spoil the story.

The Dream Show with Jane Teresa AndersonLiza described her dream as provocative and controversial as it begins with the violation, the rape, which she began to like in the dream.

The dream is symbolic, not a repressed memory of physical rape, so what does it mean, and how does it relate to Liza’s life?

Listen

Listen to more episodes

Related articles you might enjoy

Things that go bump in the night

Things that go bump in the night

Perfect but for one little thing

Perfect but for one little thing

 

Share

To dream of death means …

To dream of death means ...

“My mum says that when you dream of death it means there’s going to be a birth in the family,” said Georgie, although she was clearly disturbed about her own dream of a gravestone freshly engraved with an illegible name.

I was interpreting dreams on Mix 106.3FM Canberra’s Breakfast Show earlier this week, and Georgie had called to ask about her dream where she walked through a rose archway and stood beside her uncle looking at the gravestone, trying to read the name.

If we’d had time to deeply explore, we would have been able to work out why Georgie’s dreaming mind pictured a rose archway (not another flower, or not merely a stone archway, or a gate), and why she was accompanied by her uncle. We would have been able to explore the other details of her dream, what happened before she walked through the archway, what dramas were involved, and how she was feeling.  These things are all important.

You can’t take a dream dictionary approach to understanding dreams because our dream symbols are personal, plucked from our past experiences and blended with our recent experiences to help paint an up-to-the-minute picture of how we see the world.

My approach to training dream analysts is to help them apply what I call the dynamic methods – analysing the flow of the dream, the dramas, the feelings, the patterns and perspectives, and more – before considering symbols. Much of the meaningful insight into a dream, and into the dreamer’s mindset and approach to waking life, is achieved in this way before delving into the symbols. Then, and only then, do we enjoy applying methods to unmask personal symbols and, as one of my recent students put it, ‘nail it’.

Georgie, of course, was concerned that her dream was a premonition, either of death (her uncle, herself) if she took the dream literally, or of a birth in the family if her mum’s cultural understanding, passed through many generations, was correct.

On very rare occasions our dreams may be premonitions, and some people regularly experience dreaming about people they know who have either just died (unbeknown to the dreamer) or are about to die. But these are rare and special cases. Look back over the dreams you remember: you’ve probably had several dreams about death, all of which were symbolic.

Death is a very common dream theme, and often reflects a feeling that something (not someone) is coming to an end, or losing energy and vitality. Change is the nature of life, and to grow and flow often requires us to let go of what no longer serves us. Dreams may picture our struggles with this in themes of holding on, letting go, falling, flying, death, birth, conflict and so on. Think dynamics, rather than symbols.

Many traditional cultures believe that dreams of death predict a birth in the family. Historically, these cultures tended to have big nuclear families, big extended families, and plenty of ‘pretend’ uncles and aunties and cousins from the wider community. With death dreams being common, it’s no surprise that a fair number of death dreams may have coincided with family births – especially if you allow a few months between the dream and the birth announcement.

On the other hand, maybe these cultures understood that dreaming of endings paved the way for new beginnings, but their metaphors got taken literally along the way.

Many traditional cultures believe that dreams of losing teeth predict a death in the family. Dreams of losing teeth, and dreams of death, are two of the most common dream themes worldwide. Sooner or later at least some of those dreams are going to coincide with news of death or birth in the family.

Georgie’s mum has probably frequently mentioned her belief that dreams of death predict a birth in the family, so if Georgie had a bit of an inkling that someone was pregnant or about to give birth, her dreaming mind might bring up the death dream as a personal symbol of her feelings about the impending birth.

I bet you want to know what I said to Georgie on the radio show, don’t you?

I reminded Georgie that our dreams reflect the last 1-2 days, and said that I felt her dream reflected a recent change where she has come through (like walking through the arch) a situation with hope and vitality (like the roses) and is ready to put something from the past to rest (the gravestone).

“How does that sound?’ I asked. Along with the relief, came the confirmation, Georgie’s recognition of how the dream relates to her life.

That’s one of the things I love about doing radio work: the moment people can relate the interpretation to what has been going on during the last couple of days, their fear of a scary dream being literal evaporates and they have something meaningful and helpful to take into their daily life. And the message filters through to the listeners as well. Once we lose the fear of our dreams, and dedicate time to exploring them more deeply, they have so much to teach us about ourselves and the ways in which we walk through this world.

Related articles you might enjoy

How to cure a headache

How to cure a headache

Congratulations, it's a vampire

Congratulations, it’s a vampire!

 

Share

Episode 155 The Dream Show: Be inspired

A virtual coffee

Your-Dreams-on-Ponderabout.com

What do you think of this image? The guys at ponderabout.com came across one of my prose poems, and created this image to share on their inspirational site. It surprised me when they asked for my permission to publish one of my prose poems because I didn’t know that I had written any. I thought they must have got me mixed up with someone else, but when I looked at the image, I recognised my words, given fresh perspective. Plucked from the heart of my original article, laid out in prose poem format, given design treatment and embellished with a cartoon, the words took on more emphasis. I was inspired by their idea to treat more of my work in this way.

Actually, I’ve been blessed with a few creative inspirations this week, so I thought I’d make ‘Be Inspired’ the theme of this episode.

The Dream Show with Jane Teresa AndersonListen as we delve into some of the points listed on the image, and discover how to be inspired by looking at life from different perspectives, ranging from the perspective of your dreams to the imagined perspective of a steaming pile of cow poo. At the end of the podcast I give you a ‘Be inspired’ checklist, suggesting you pick just one (ok maybe more than one) to follow into action today. Enjoy.

Listen

Listen to more episodes

Related articles you might enjoy

Camouflage and the facts of life

Camouflage and the facts of life

Something old Something new

Something old Something new

Share
css.php